2017

1/17-Race and the American Dream with Nikole Hannah-Jones and Jason Riley

7 PM, Room 215, L.V. Eberhard Center
301 Fulton St. W., Grand Rapids, MI 49504

American conversations about race are defined by the sobering realities of history and the poignant echoes of memory. Given the complexity of the past and the fractured nature of our present moment, no easy solution exists for the vexing problem of racial inequality. However, on an issue of such enduring importance, progressives and conservatives must recognize the common ground that we all can share: a firm belief in the value of teaching and learning with one another.

In commemoration of the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the Hauenstein Center is proud to partner with Grand Valley’s Division of Inclusion and Equity to host an event on race and the American Dream. Jason Riley, columnist and editorial board member at The Wall Street Journal, will join Nikole Hannah-Jones, award-winning staff writer at The New York Times Magazine, for a dialogue on the progress that has been made since the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, as well as the challenges that continue to exist, in the pursuit of an equitable society for people of all colors.

1/20-Julie Metty Bennet-The Wheelhouse Talks

More information regarding this event will be announced soon.

The Wheelhouse Talks feature cross-disciplinary, local leaders who are eager to share their leadership philosophy and experience. Leaders of today and tomorrow come together to evoke personal stories of learning and growth. Throughout the series, shared leadership values — responsibility, energy, community, and authenticity — are center stage. The Wheelhouse Talks provide fellows and the public with an opportunity to engage with those making an impact in our community today.

2/9-H.W. Brands: The General vs the President

7 PM, Room 215, L.V. Eberhard Center
301 Fulton St. W., Grand Rapids, MI 49504

At the dawn of a new era in American history, President Harry S. Truman struggled with unfavorable public opinion wrought against him in response to growing concerns about the Soviet Union and a challenging economic transition following World War II. For this embattled president, the future appeared complicated and uncertain.

In stark contrast to Truman, General Douglas MacArthur enjoyed immense popularity. His experiences in war led him to believe in the inevitability of a military showdown with communist countries. For this celebrated general, the future was easy to predict and urgent in its demands.

Distinguished historian H.W. Brands will discuss the conflict between these different men, a story that unfolded amid the challenges of the Korean War and the hysteria of McCarthyism. His latest book, The General vs. the President: MacArthur and Truman at the Brink of Nuclear War, is sure to please those seeking to learn more about the relationship between two iconic figures of American life at midcentury.

2/10-Teresa Weatherall Neal- The Wheelhouse Talks

More information regarding this event will be announced soon.

The Wheelhouse Talks feature cross-disciplinary, local leaders who are eager to share their leadership philosophy and experience. Leaders of today and tomorrow come together to evoke personal stories of learning and growth. Throughout the series, shared leadership values — responsibility, energy, community, and authenticity — are center stage. The Wheelhouse Talks provide fellows and the public with an opportunity to engage with those making an impact in our community today.

3/15- Stephen Shedletzky- The Wheelhouse Talks

Speakers for our 2017 Wheelhouse Talks Series will be announced soon.

The Wheelhouse Talks feature cross-disciplinary, local leaders who are eager to share their leadership philosophy and experience. Leaders of today and tomorrow come together to evoke personal stories of learning and growth. Throughout the series, shared leadership values — responsibility, energy, community, and authenticity — are center stage. The Wheelhouse Talks provide fellows and the public with an opportunity to engage with those making an impact in our community today.

4/4-Martha Nussbaum: Anger and Revolutionary Justice

7 PM, Room 215, L.V. Eberhard Center
301 Fulton St. W., Grand Rapids, MI 49504

At this fractious time in our nation’s political history, no intellectual exercise could prove more timely than serious reflection on the influence of anger in public life. While it is tempting to think of anger as a fair and effective response to perceived injustice, it is noteworthy that three of the twentieth century’s great freedom movements succeeded by way of leaders who deliberately embraced non-anger: Mohandas Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Nelson Mandela. As a force for positive change, history demonstrates that anger is deeply flawed in both philosophical and practical terms.

Martha Nussbaum, world-famous philosopher, classicist, and legal scholar at the University of Chicago, will give an address on the limits of anger. This presentation is sure to illustrate our vital need for leaders who can recognize the humanity of those who think differently, especially when the stakes are high.

Check back later for RSVP capability.

4/27- Barbara Kellerman- The Wheelhouse Talks

Speakers for our 2016-2017 Wheelhouse Talks Series will be announced soon.

The Wheelhouse Talks feature cross-disciplinary, local leaders who are eager to share their leadership philosophy and experience. Leaders of today and tomorrow come together to evoke personal stories of learning and growth. Throughout the series, shared leadership values — responsibility, energy, community, and authenticity — are center stage. The Wheelhouse Talks provide fellows and the public with an opportunity to engage with those making an impact in our community today.

June-Finding the Lost Region: 2017

Third Annual Midwestern History Conference

The Midwestern History Association and the Hauenstein Center at Grand Valley State University invite proposals for papers to be delivered at the Third Annual Midwestern History Conference to be held on June 7, 2016 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. This conference continues a discussion commenced during the last two years during collaborative conferences at the Hauenstein Center designed to spark the revival of Midwestern studies.

We welcome papers of all kinds relating to all aspects of the history of the American Midwest. Given that this year’s conference will be held in collaboration with the Agricultural History Society, we are particularly interested in proposals that relate to the agricultural and rural history of the American Midwest and some of those proposals could become part of hybrid panels organized by the Midwestern History Association, the Hauenstein Center, and the Agricultural History Society and held during a special collaborative session on June 8, 2016. We encourage participants in the Midwestern history conference to also attend the Agricultural History Society annual meeting, which will be held immediately following the Midwestern history conference on the campus of Grand Valley State University from June 8-10.

Individual proposals should be a maximum of 300 words and describe the topic to be addressed. Panel proposals are also welcome and should be a maximum of 1,000 words. All proposals should be accompanied by the short vitas of the participants. Proposals should be sent to Scott St. Louis of Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center at stlouis1@gvsu.edu There is no registration fee for attending the Midwestern history conference but there will be a request to RSVP online in coming months.

The Midwestern History Association, created in the fall of 2014, is dedicated to rebuilding the field of Midwestern history, which has suffered from decades of neglect and inattention. The MHA advocates for greater attention to Midwestern history among professional historians, seeks to rebuild the infrastructure necessary for the study of the American Midwest, promotes greater academic discourse relating to Midwestern history, and offers prizes to scholars who excel in the study of the Midwest. To become a member of the Midwestern History Association, please contact MHA Secretary Ted Frantz at efrantz@uindy.edu

Inspired by Ralph Hauenstein’s life of leadership and service and housed at Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies is dedicated to raising a community of ethical, effective leaders for the twenty-first century. The Center’s Common Ground Initiative engages thought leaders to confront the political and cultural challenges our diverse communities face. By challenging humanities scholars, culture commentators, and political leaders from the left and right to explore the possible common ground between their respective camps, the Hauenstein Center promotes common ground for the common good.

Proposals are due by January 1, 2017.

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