11/11-Dr. Steven Ealy on Leadership

Description

November 11, 2009

Dr. Steven Ealy, senior fellow at the Liberty Fund, Inc. addressed the November meeting of the Leadership Academy Fellows program. This luncheon address took place in the Meijer Regency Room at GVSU’s downtown campus.

http://hauensteincenter.org/meeting-of-the-leadership-fellows-program-3/

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11/3-Michigan’s Defining Moment: Community Conversations

Description

November 3, 2009
Michigan’s Defining Moment intro video for Community Conversations.

http://hauensteincenter.org/michigans-defining-moment-community-conversations/

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10/29-Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression

Description

October 29, 2009

On October 29, 2009, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum & Library welcomed Dr. George Nash, independent scholar and author to speak on President Herbert Hoover’s impact on the Great Depression. The lecture was held at the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

http://hauensteincenter.org/herbert-hoover-and-the-great-depression/

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Part 1

Part 2




Media Gallery

10/27-Strenuous Life Leadership

Description

October 27, 2009

Brian Flanagan, Associate Director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential studies at GVSU led a workshop titled “Strenuous Life Leadership.” Mr. Flanagan’s workshop examined the idea of self improvement in leaders through the works of Confucius, Aristotle, Benjamin Franklin, and Henry Adams.

http://hauensteincenter.org/strenuous-life-leadership/

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10/21-Hauenstein Center Policy Roundtable

Description

October 21, 2009

On October 21, 2009, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies hosted its inaugural policy roundtable discussion series where a group of scholars and students discuss one of the speaker’s presentations. The Center’s first roundtable featured Dr. Jim Goode (GVSU History), Dr. Erika King (GVSU Political Science), Dr. Heather Tafel (GVSU Political Science), and Dr. Joel Westra (Calvin College Political Science). These scholars led a discussion evaluating Herb Meyer’s presentation titled “What in the World is Going On?.” The presentation took place in 302E DeVos, located at Grand Valley’s Pew Campus.

http://hauensteincenter.org/hauenstein-center-policy-roundtable/

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10/20-What in the World is Going On? An Intelligence Briefing for GVSU

Description

October 20, 2009

On October 20, 2009, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies hosted Herb Meyer, the former special assistant to the director of central intelligence during the Reagan administration. Mr. Meyer gave a lecture titled “What in the World is Going On?” where he briefed the audience in recent demographic, economic, and political trends that will affect how America conducts foreign policy in the 21st century. The event took place in the Loosemore auditorium, locacated on GVSU’s downtown campus.

http://hauensteincenter.org/what-in-the-world-is-going-on-an-intelligence-briefing-for-gvsu/

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10/16-From Cold War to War on Terror

Description

October 16, 2009

On October 16, 2009 two Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies staffers, Brian Flanagan (associate director) and Austin Knuppe (research assistant), presented papers at GVSU’s “From Cold War to War on Terror” conference in the Kirkhof Center at the Allendale campus. Both presentations examined how America’s approach to the Cold War has influenced her foreign policy approach during the Global War on Terror.

http://hauensteincenter.org/from-cold-war-to-war-on-terror/

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10/13-Nothing to Fear? Debating Today’s Economic Recovery

Description

October 13, 2009

On October 13, 2009, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies hosted a panel of economics to debate the issue of government intervention during economic recessions. Dr. John Tiemstra (Calvin College), Dr. Dan Giedeman (Grand Valley State University), and Dr. Hari Singh (Grand Valley State University) took the pro government intervention position. Dr. Gary Wolfram (Hillsdale College), Larry Reed (Foundation for Economic Education), and Harry Veryser (University of Detriot, Mercy) took the anti government intervention position. The debate took place in Loosemore Auditorium, located at GVSU’s downtown Grand Rapids campus.

http://hauensteincenter.org/nothing-to-fear-debating-todays-economic-recovery/

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10/13-Brian Domitrovic on ‘Econoclasts’

Description

October 13, 2009

Speaker: Brian Domitrovic

http://hauensteincenter.org/brian-domitrovic-on-econoclasts/

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10/12-Amity Shlaes – Jonathan Alter – The Great Depression

Description

October 12, 2009

On October 12, 2009, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and the Seidman College of Business at GVSU co-hosted a debate between Bloomberg’s Amity Shlaes and Newsweek’s Jonathan Alter. The debate was titled “Nothing to Fear? Debating the 1929 Economic Collapse,” and was hosted at Fountain Street Church in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

http://hauensteincenter.org/amity-shlaes-and-jonathan-alter-debate-the-great-depression/

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10/7-Michael Flanagan

Description

October 7, 2009

Michael Flanagan, Michigan’s State Superintendent of Public Instruction, addressed the October meeting of the Leadership Academy Fellows program. The luncheon address took place in the Meijer Regency Room at GVSU’s downtown campus.

http://hauensteincenter.org/meeting-of-the-leadership-fellows-program-2/

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9/29-The Right to Rise – Brian Flanagan

Description

September 29, 2009

On September 29, 2009, Brian Flanagan joined the Hauenstein Center to present his speech The Right to Rise:
Abraham Lincoln and the Pursuit of Happiness
. Here’s an excerpt from his speech:

“How then do we explain Lincoln’s rise? How do we explain his ability – through death, horrible love affairs, and profound depression – to even approximate happiness in his private life? Among the answers are three qualities we often remember Lincoln for today: his love of education, his sense of humor, and his abounding ambition.”

Click here to read the full transcript.

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9/22-The Illative Sense

Description

September 9, 2009

This module was part of the Peter C. Cook Leadership Academy’s workshop titled “Leadership for the Ages.” This workshop provided an overview of the principles, traits, skills, books, and facts that are essential knowledge for aspiring leaders. Using examples from the ancient and modern world, this workshop prepared students for the rest by providing a broad view of leadership and its many manifestations. The workshop took place in the Kirkhoff Center at GVSU’s Allendale campus.

http://hauensteincenter.org/the-illative-sense/

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9/17-A Constitution Day Event

Description

September 17, 2009

Grand Valley’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, the Gerald R. Ford Foundation, and the Ford Presidential Library & Museum were proud to host George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. More than 100 years combined of experience interpreting the Rushmore presidents shared the stage for a Constitution Day celebration at East Grand Rapids High School.

http://hauensteincenter.org/a-constitution-day-event/

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9/15-Believing in the American Dream: Abraham Lincoln

Description

September 15, 2009

The reason President Obama and other leaders admire Lincoln is that he overcame so many obstacles to reach the White House. Gleaves Whitney explained how Abraham Lincoln’s life is a case study in achievement and the American Dream. His lecture took place at the Spring Lake District Library.

http://hauensteincenter.org/believing-in-the-american-dream-abraham-lincoln/

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9/9-Dr. Gayle Davis on Leadership

Description

September 9, 2009

The Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies welcomed Dr. Gayle Davis, provost of Grand Valley State University to speak to the students on leadership in academia.

http://hauensteincenter.org/meeting-of-the-leadership-fellows-program/

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Preview

8/28-Media Gallery: LAF Welcome Mixer 2009

Description

August 28, 2009

The Hauenstein Center’s Peter C. Cook Leadership Academy hosted a mixer to welcome the 2009-2010 Leadership Fellows to the Academy.

7/4-The Kitchen Debate: Nixon & Khrushchev

Description

July 4, 2009

In an age of bombastic rhetoric and political theater, then Vice President Nixon’s encounter with Nikita Khrushchev at the American National Exhibition in Moscow stands out. The New York Times hearlded the “Kitchen Debate” as “an exchange that emphasized the gulf between east and west but had little bearing on the substantive issue.” TIME Magazine argued that Nixon “managed in a unique way to personify a national character proud of peaceful accomplishment, sure of its way of life, confident of its power under threat.” Despite it’s strange setting — in front of a display of American kitchen equipment — this impromptu debate stands as one of the greatest intellectual exchanges on the merits of capitalism versus communism. On this 50th anniversary of the “Kitchen Debate” it would due all Americans well to reflect on this skilled, yet subtle, diplomatic victory during the Cold War.

http://hauensteincenter.org/the-kitchen-debate-nixon-khrushchev/

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5/7-Saving the Jews: FDR and the Holocaust

Description

May 7, 2009

Grand Valley’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, the Kaufman Interfaith Institute, the Ford Foundation, and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library & Museum hosted a presentation by bestselling author Robert Rosen.

Six million Jews died in the Holocaust. Since the 1960s, when a post-World War II generation of historians came of age, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt has increasingly been seen as, at best, standing idly by while this atrocity occurred. But is this an accurate picture? In his book, Saving the Jews: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Holocaust, Robert N. Rosen argues that, in fact, FDR was one of the few men of his time who understood — and sought to defeat — the enormous threat Hitler posed, and that the Roosevelt Administration did all that could reasonably be done, under the circumstances, to save the Jews and other victims of Nazism.

Based on vigorous research, Rosen’s narrative and interpretive history placed FDR’s actions in the context of the time period in which they occurred — an era characterized by The Great Depression, widespread American isolationism, strict immigration legislation, and extensive anti-Semitism. Rosen revealed that, seen in this light, FDR’s achievements in battling Nazism and saving Jews were very nearly monumental. “Roosevelt did not abandon the Jews of Europe,” he writes. “On the contrary, he led the worldwide coalition against Nazism in a war that took fifty million lives.”

Rosen offered extensive evidence of FDR’s close ties to Jewish leaders, and his appointment of many Jews to high-level positions, including the Supreme Court. Rosen outlined the numerous attempts FDR made to allow Jewish refugees to enter the United States — and explained why, at weaker periods of his presidency, FDR simply didn’t have the political capital to wage these battles. He also offered a full picture of the overwhelming mood in the country — the strong desire to remain neutral regarding European affairs and the distrust of anything that smacked of internationalism. And he pointed to divisions in the American Jewish community, which had not reached a consensus as to the best policy for freeing their European counterparts from Nazi persecution. Rosen took on each of the chief accusations frequently leveled at Roosevelt with regard to his handling of the Holocaust, and demonstrated why these charges are unfair and unfounded.

http://hauensteincenter.org/saving-the-jews-fdr-and-the-holocaust/

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5/7-Road Scholars: Robert Rosen

Description

May 7, 2009

Hauenstein Center Director Gleaves Whitney interviewed Robert Rosen, who is a lawyer, historian, and author of “Saving the Jews: Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the Holocaust.”

Six million Jews died in the Holocaust. Since the 1960s, when a post-World War II generation of historians came of age, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt has increasingly been seen as, at best, standing idly by while this atrocity occurred. But is this an accurate picture?

Robert Rosen, author of “Saving the Jews: Franklin Delano Roosevelt and the Holocaust, explored this question and others on May 7 in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Mr. Rosen is a shareholder in the Rosen Law Firm in Charleston, South Carolina. He received his B.A. in history from the University of Virginia in 1969, his M.A. in history from Harvard University in 1970, and his J.D. from the University of South Carolina School of Law in 1973. He has also authored books on the history of Charleston and on the American Civil War.

http://hauensteincenter.org/road-scholars-robert-rosen/

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4/27-25th Annual Administrative/Professional Luncheon

Description

April 27, 2009

Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, was the keynote speaker at the 25th annual Administrative/Professional Luncheon on Monday, April 27, in the Kirkhof Center.

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4/20-Steven Ford on Leadership

Description

April 20, 2009

Steven Ford – actor, motivational speaker, and son of President Gerald R. Ford – addressed the Hauenstein Center’s Peter Cook Leadership Fellows.

Mr. Ford is the son of former first couple Gerald and Betty Ford. He spent part of his young adulthood in the White House before heading west to become a cattle rancher, and then to Utah State University and California Polytechnic State University to study range management, animal science, and equine studies.

Mr. Ford is a screen actor who has appeared in more than 30 films, including “Escape from New York” (1981), “When Harry Met Sally” (1989), “Heat” (1995), “Starship Troopers” (1997), “Armageddon” (1998), “Black Hawk Down” (2001), and most recently, “Transformers” (2007). Throughout his 30-year acting career, he has also made guest appearances on numerous television shows, including “Happy Days,” “The Young and the Restless,” “Murder She Wrote,” “JAG,” “Baywatch,” “Walker, Texas Ranger,” and “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.”

Like his mother, Betty, Ford struggled with alcoholism in his life. And, like his mother, he made the best of it by turning his life around, raising money for charitable organizations, and giving speeches and motivational talks to student groups in the United States and abroad.

http://hauensteincenter.org/steven-ford-on-leadership/

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4/17-Barack Obama and the Lessons of Antiquity

Description

April 17, 2009

Robert Garland (Colgate University), Walter Nicgorski (University of Notre Dame), Charles Pazdernik (Grand Valley State University), and Kelli Rudolph (Grand Valley State University) participated in the first panel of the Hauenstein Center’s conference, “Barack Obama and the Lessons of Antiquity.”

http://hauensteincenter.org/the-individual-the-state-lessons-from-antiquity-2/

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Dr. Pazdernik, associate professor and chair of classics at Grand Valley State University, earned his B.A. at Cornell University, M.Phil. at the University of Oxford, and M.A. and Ph.D. at Princeton University. He won the Pew Teaching Excellence Award in 2005 and he is a junior fellow at Harvard’s Center for Hellenic Studies. He has authored and edited several books.

Kelli Rudolph, assistant professor of the classics at Grand Valley State University, earned her A.B. at Princeton, and her M.Phil and Ph.D. from University of Cambridge. She teaches ancient philosophy and science, as well as Presocratics an their influence on Hellenistic philosophy.

Dr. Robert Garland, director of the Division of the Humanities at Colgate University and professor of the classics, received his B.A. from Manchester University (1969), M.A. from McMaster University (1973), and Ph.D. from the University College London (1981). His teaching is on Ancient history and the classics, with special emphasis on Greek religion, Greek urban development, Greek society and social values, and Athenian topography.

He is author of several books, including “Daily Life of the Ancient Greeks” (1998), “The Eye of the Beholder” (1995), “Religion and the Greeks” (1994), and “The Greek Way of Life” (1990).

Jeremy McInerney (University of Pennsylvania), Tracy Lee Simmons (Hillsdale College), and Carl Richard (University of Louisiana-Lafayette) participated in the second panel of the Hauenstein Center’s conference, “Barack Obama and the Lessons of Antiquity.”

Dr. McInerney is associate professor of history at the University of Pennsylvania and chair of the Graduate Group in Ancient History. He earned his B.A. from Macquarie University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley. He is an award-winning teacher on the ancient world, and author of numerous articles. His book is “The Folds of Parnassos: Land and Ethnicity in Ancient Phokis” (1999).

Mr. Simmons is director of the Herbert H. Dow II Chair in Journalism and lecturer in journalism at Hillsdale College. He earned his B.A. from the University of Cincinnati and his M.A. in language and literature from the University of Oxford. He teaches on journalism, history, and writing.

Dr. Richard is professor of History (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 1988) at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette. His research and teaching focus on early national American history and U.S. intellectual history. He has authored several works, including Twelve Greeks and Romans Who Changed the World (2003), The Founders and the Classics: Greece, Rome, and the American Enlightenment (1994), The Classical Roots of the U.S. Congress: Mixed Government Theory in Inventing Congress: Origins and Establishment of the First Federal Congress (1999), A Dialogue with the Ancients: Thomas Jefferson and Classical Philosophy and History in Journal of the Early Republic (1989), and The Shadow of a Plan: The Rationale Behind Wilsons 1918 Siberian Intervention in The Historian (1986).

Bruce Thornton, classicist and professor at California State University, Fresno, gave the morning keynote address in the Hauenstein Center’s conference, “Barack Obama and the Lessons of Antiquity.” He presented a paper on President Obama’s foreign policy, “Diplomacy and Appeasement: Philip II of Macedon and the Loss of Greek Freedom.”

Dr. Thornton, a native of Fresno County, received his B.A. in Latin from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1975, and his Ph.D. in comparative literature (Greek, Latin, and English) from UCLA in 1983.

He is the author of numerous essays and reviews on Greek culture and civilization and their influence on Western civilizations, and also has written on contemporary political and educational issues. His writings have appeared in The National Review Online, Heterodoxy, The National Herald, Arion, The San Francisco Examiner, The American Enterprise Magazine, The University Bookman, Religious Studies Review, Intercollegiate Review, The Washington Times, Los Angeles Times, Helios, and the American Journal of Philology.

Thornton is the author of numerous books, including “Searching for Joaquin: Myth and History in California” (2002); “Bonfire of the Humanities. Rescuing the Classics in an Impoverished Age,” with John Heath and Victor Davis Hanson (2001); “Greek Ways. How the Greeks Created Western Civilization” (2000); “Plagues of the Mind: The New Epidemic of False Knowledge” (1999); and “Eros the Killer: The Myth of Ancient Greek Sexuality” (1997).

Thornton is a frequent guest on talk radio shows across the nation, has lectured at venues such as The Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C., and appears regularly on ABC’s “Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher.” He is a regular contributor to the popular conservative Web site www.CaliforniaRepublic.org, commenting on societal trends, cultural issues and news events.

Dr. Nicgorski, professor in liberal studies at the University of Notre Dame, received his B.A. from Georgetown University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. He is a classically trained political theorist whose primary interests are the political thought of Cicero, that of the American founding, the theory and practice of moral and liberal education and contemporary democratic theory impacted by Christianity. His articles on Cicero, liberal and character education, the American founding, Leo Strauss, and Allan Bloom and other topics have appeared in journals such as Political Theory, Interpretation, and the Political Science Reviewer. He co-edited An Almost Chosen People: The Moral aspirations of Americans (1976) and Leo Strauss: Political Philosopher and Jewish Thinker (1994). Nicgorski is the former editor of The Review of Politics. He has directed NEH summer seminars on the texts of Cicero. He has held a Lilly Endowment faculty fellowship, as well as research fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Bradley Foundation, and the Earhart Foundation.

Dr. Fears is David Ross Boyd Professor of Classics at the University of Oklahoma, where he holds the G.T. and Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty. Professor Fears earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University and is a fellow of many distinguished organizations, such as the American Academy in Rome, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. His research has been supported by institutions such as the American Philosophical Society and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Before taking his post at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Fears held teaching positions at Indiana University, where he rose from assistant professor to full professor, and Boston University, where he served as Chair of the Department of Classical Studies. Professor Fears is the author of four books, including The Cult of Virtues and Roman Imperial Ideology, and has published a three-volume edition of Selected Writings of Lord Acton, the great British historian of liberty. He has also published more than 100 articles and reviews, and other writings on ancient history, the history of liberty, and the lessons of history for our own day.

President Barack Obama ran for office promising to catalyze change in America. Yet, any American president is going to operate in the context of much continuity: of thought, of habit and tradition, of political process. The founding fathers of President Obama’s government inherited much from antiquity and from the old world. His challenge will be to enact change in the midst of overwhelming continuity.

Questions About the Founders & Antiquity

http://hauensteincenter.org/media-gallery-the-founding-fathers-the-lessons-of-antiquity/
http://hauensteincenter.org/media-gallery-what-president-obama-can-learn-about-freedom/

4/8-H. W. Brands on Leadership

Description

April 8, 2009

H. W. Brands, biographer and professor of history and government at the University of Texas, Austin, addressed the Hauenstein Center’s Peter Cook Leadership Fellows at their March 2008 meeting.

He has won numerous awards for his teaching and writing. He is author of two dozen books, including biographies of Presidents Andrew Jackson (2005), Woodrow Wilson (2003), Theodore Roosevelt (1997), and Lyndon Johnson (1995). His book, “Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt,” was released on Election Day 2008.

http://hauensteincenter.org/h-w-brands-on-leadership/

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4/8-Rev. Robert A. Sirico on Leadership

Description

April 8, 2009

Reverend Robert Sirico, president of the Acton Institute for the Study of Religion and Liberty, addressed the Hauenstein Center’s Peter Cook Leadership Fellows at their April meeting.

Rev. Robert A. Sirico received his Master of Divinity degree from the Catholic University of America, following undergraduate study at the University of Southern California and the University of London. During his studies and early ministry, he experienced a growing concern over the lack of training religious studies students receive in fundamental economic principles, leaving them poorly equipped to understand and address today’s social problems. As a result of these concerns, Father Sirico co-founded the Acton Institute with Kris Alan Mauren in 1990.

As president of the Acton Institute, Father Sirico lectures at colleges, universities, and business organizations throughout the U.S. and abroad. His writings on religious, political, economic, and social matters are published in a variety of journals, including: the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Forbes, London Financial Times, Washington Times, Detroit News, and National Review. Fr. Sirico is often called upon by members of the broadcast media for statements regarding economics, civil rights, and issues of religious concern, and has provided commentary for CNN, ABC, the BBC, NPR, and CBS’ 60 Minutes, among others.

http://hauensteincenter.org/meeting-of-the-leadership-academy-12/

4/2-President Obama’s First 100 Days: A Hauenstein Center Debate

Description

April 2, 2009

Katrina vanden Heuvel, editor of The Nation, and Rich Lowry, editor of National Review, debated the first 100 days of the Obama presidency at a Hauenstein Center event in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

http://hauensteincenter.org/debate-obamas-first-100-days/

3/31-Richard Norton Smith on the Hauenstein Center

Description

March 31, 2009

Presidential historian Richard Norton Smith, author, and former director of five presidential museums and frequent commentator on C-SPAN and ABC, spoke about Grand Valley’s Hauenstein Center. The presidential museums he has directed include the Abraham Lincoln, Herbert Hoover, Dwight Eisenhower, Gerald Ford, and Ronald Reagan.

http://hauensteincenter.org/richard-norton-smith-on-the-hauenstein-center/

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3/31-J. Rufus Fears on the Hauenstein Center

Description

March 31, 2009

J. Rufus Fears is David Ross Boyd Professor of Classics at the University of Oklahoma, where he holds the G.T. and Libby Blankenship Chair in the History of Liberty. Professor Fears earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University and is a fellow of many distinguished organizations, such as the American Academy in Rome, the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, and the Guggenheim Foundation. His research has been supported by institutions such as the American Philosophical Society and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Before taking his post at the University of Oklahoma, Dr. Fears held teaching positions at Indiana University, where he rose from assistant professor to full professor, and Boston University, where he served as Chair of the Department of Classical Studies. Professor Fears is the author of four books, including The Cult of Virtues and Roman Imperial Ideology, and has published a three-volume edition of Selected Writings of Lord Acton, the great British historian of liberty. He has also published more than 100 articles and reviews, and other writings on ancient history, the history of liberty, and the lessons of history for our own day.

http://hauensteincenter.org/j-rufus-fears-on-the-hauenstein-center/

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3/29-Obama in History

Description

March 19, 2009

H. W. Brands, historian and biographer of presidents, spoke on “Obama in History” at an event co-hosted by Grand Valley State University’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and the Gerald R. Ford Museum.

His eloquence has been compared to Ronald Reagan’s and John Kennedy’s. His task – in the face of an economic crisis of historic proportions and two ongoing wars – has been compared to Franklin Roosevelt’s. He took the oath of office with his hand on Abraham Lincoln’s Bible; compared his cabinet to Lincoln’s “team of rivals”; and in his inaugural address, linked today’s challenges to those faced by George Washington and his men at Valley Forge. At the end of his second month in office, President Obama had attracted lofty comparisons to the most revered of his forty-two predecessors. Are such lofty comparisons justified? Who better to put President Obama in context than an award-winning historian and biographer of presidents?

H. W. Brands, professor of history at the University of Texas, has won numerous awards for his teaching and writing. He is author of two dozen books, including biographies of Presidents Andrew Jackson (2005), Woodrow Wilson (2003), Theodore Roosevelt (1997), and Lyndon Johnson (1995). His most recent book, “Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt,” was released on Election Day 2008.

http://hauensteincenter.org/obama-in-history/

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Obama in History

H.W. Brands on the Hauenstein Center

The Sexiest President

3/19-Road Scholars: H. W. Brands

Description

March 19, 2009

Hauenstein Center Director Gleaves Whitney interviewed historian H. W. Brands.

H. W. Brands, professor of history at the University of Texas, has won numerous awards for his teaching and writing. He is author of two dozen books, including biographies of Presidents Andrew Jackson (2005), Woodrow Wilson (2003), Theodore Roosevelt (1997), and Lyndon Johnson (1995). His book, “Traitor to His Class: The Privileged Life and Radical Presidency of Franklin Delano Roosevelt,” was released on Election Day 2008.

http://hauensteincenter.org/road-scholars-h-w-brands/

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3/11-Hank Meijer on Leadership

Description

March 11, 2009

Hank Meijer spoke at the March meeting of the Hauenstein Center’s Peter Cook Leadership Academy.

Hendrik “Hank” Meijer is co-chairman and co-CEO of Meijer, Inc., which operates 176 stores in Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky. A graduate of the University of Michigan with a degree in English and significant graduate work in history, Meijer is the vice chair of the Gerald R. Ford Foundation board of trustees, vice president of the Grand Rapids Area Council for the Humanities, and a board member for Fifth Third Bank, the Kettering Foundation, and the Food Marketing Institute. He is author of Thrifty Years: The Life of Hendrik Meijer, and a forthcoming book about Arthur Vandenberg, the influential U.S. senator from Grand Rapids who became a chief architect of U.S. foreign policy after World War II. Meijer has been a Hauenstein Center associate since 2006, and he has made four presentations at Hauenstein Center events.

http://hauensteincenter.org/meeting-of-the-leadership-academy-11/

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2/12-Lincoln vs. Douglas

Description

February 12, 2009

Lincoln vs. Douglas: An Abraham LIncoln Bicentennial Reenactment

Abraham Lincoln, born two hundred years ago on February 12, was out of politics by the age of 40. Politically damaged by his exuberant opposition to President James K. Polk and the Mexican War, the four-term Illinois state legislator and one-term U.S. representative retired to his law practice in Springfield. It was Stephen Douglas’s Kansas-Nebraska Act — repealing limits on slavery’s extension into the nation’s wester territories — that provoked Lincoln’s return. On the campaign trail in the fall of 1858, seven famous debates with Senator Douglas not only established Lincoln as a leading voice against slavery, but they also positioned the future president to redefine America as a nation “conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

On February 12, Grand Valley’s Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum celebrated Lincoln’s 200th birthday with a debate reenactment starring interpreters Jim Getty (Gettysburg’s Lincoln) and Tim Connors (Springfield’s Douglas).

http://hauensteincenter.org/lincoln-douglas/

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2/12-What Made Lincoln Great?

Description

February 12, 2009

Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies, spoke to the Grand Forum. He talked about, “The First Thing You’ll Notice About Leaders.” Using Abraham Lincoln as a case study, Whitney illustrated five qualities we notice about leaders.

http://hauensteincenter.org/what-made-lincoln-great/

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2/11-Maribeth Wardrop

Description

February 11, 2009

Maribeth Wardrop, vice president for development at Grand Valley State University, spoke at the February meeting of the Hauenstein Center’s Peter Cook Leadership Academy.

http://hauensteincenter.org/meeting-of-the-leadership-academy-10/

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2/10-Abraham Lincoln and the Pursuit of Happiness

Description

February 10, 2009

Brian Flanagan, associate director of the Hauenstein Center and a member of the Michigan Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Committee, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“Abraham Lincoln and the Pursuit of Happiness”
Abraham Lincolns biography is a story forged through poverty, tragedy, and depression. Yet, Lincoln emerged as a man determined to pursue personal, public, and political happiness. Flanagan explores Lincoln’s personal struggles, his Whig philosophy, and his rededication of the nation to its founding principles in the Declaration of Independence.

http://hauensteincenter.org/abraham-lincoln-and-the-pursuit-of-happiness/

2/10-Abraham Lincoln, the Middle East, and the Beginnings of American Empire

Description

February 10, 2009

Austin Knuppe, research assistant at the Hauenstein Center, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“Abraham Lincoln, the Middle East, and the Beginnings of American Empire”
Narratives of U.S. relations with the Middle East usually begin in 1919, with a footnote on Thomas Jefferson’s confrontation with the Barbary pirates in Tripoli. Knuppe looks at the deep roots of U.S.-Middle Eastern relations, with emphasis on Abraham Lincoln’s presidency and the policies of his secretary of state.

http://hauensteincenter.org/abraham-lincoln-the-middle-east-and-the-beginnings-of-american-empire/

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2/10-The First Thing You’ll Notice About Lincoln

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February 10, 2009

Gleaves Whitney, director of the Hauenstein Center and a member of the Michigan Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Committee, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“The First Thing You’ll Notice About Lincoln”
Abraham Lincoln is considered by most to be one of the greatest presidents in American history — and one of the greatest leaders. Whitney explores four qualities that made Lincoln a great leader.

http://hauensteincenter.org/the-first-thing-youll-notice-about-lincoln/

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2/10-American Indians and the Great Emancipator

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February 10, 2009

Scott Stabler, assistant professor of history at Grand Valley State University, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“American Indians and the Great Emancipator”
Abraham Lincoln’s only military service was in the Black Hawk War, waged to subdue American Indians in the Midwest. Stabler looks at the dissonant Indian policies of the “Great Emancipator” and how they contributed to the fate of this continent’s indigenous peoples.

http://hauensteincenter.org/american-indians-and-the-great-emancipator/

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2/9-An Abraham Lincoln Tribute

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February 9, 2009

Cameron Brown, a senator in the Michigan state legislaturer and a member of the Michigan Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Committee, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“An Abraham Lincoln Tribute”
Since a boyhood visit to Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C. — where his relative Joseph Sessford collected tickets on the evening Abraham Lincoln was assassinated — Senator Brown has shared the fascination of countless Americans with our 16th president. He explores Lincoln’s life and what it means to us today.

http://hauensteincenter.org/an-abraham-lincoln-tribute/

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2/9-De(a)dication: Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg

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February 9, 2009

Michael Zuckert, professor and chair of political science at the University of Notre Dame, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“De(a)dication: Abraham Lincoln at Gettysburg”
Long before a speechwriting staff was established in the White House, President Abraham Lincoln penned some of the most memorable and consequential words in our nation’s history. Zuckert will unpack the meaning of the Gettysburg Address, providing insight into Lincoln as a political thinker and actor.

http://hauensteincenter.org/deadication-abraham-lincoln-at-gettysburg/

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2/9-Lincolnian Literature

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February 9, 2009

Bill Anderson, chairman of the Michigan Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Committee, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“Lincolnian Literature”
More has written about Abraham Lincoln than any other American, and in the bicentennial year of his birth numerous historians and commentators will add new works to bookstore shelves. Anderson reviews the greatest Lincoln biographies and histories to date.

http://hauensteincenter.org/lincolnian-literature/

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2/9-Three Heroic Journeys: Abraham Lincoln and the Power of Myth

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February 9, 2009

Brian Flanagan, associate director of the Hauenstein Center and a member of the Michigan Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Committee, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“Three Heroic Journeys: Abraham Lincoln and the Power of Myth”
Abraham Lincoln’s rise from depression and poverty to battle the slave power parallels the path of mythic heroes, from ancient and medieval literature through modern science fiction. Flanagan explores this phenomenon, its roots, and its implications.

http://hauensteincenter.org/three-heroic-journeys-abraham-lincoln-and-the-power-of-myth/

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2/9-Abraham Lincoln: A Full Measure of Greatness

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February 9, 2009

William Anderson, chairman of the Michigan Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Committee, gave a talk at the Hauenstein Center’s Lincoln Bicentennial Lecture Series. The Center’s series was part of the annual conference of the Michigan Council for the Social Studies.

“Abraham Lincoln: A Full Measure of Greatness”
Since scholars began rating presidents in 1948, Abraham Lincoln has consistently been ranked among the top three. Anderson explores why that has been the case, while putting the 16th president in the context of five unique challenges he faced.

http://hauensteincenter.org/abraham-lincoln-a-full-measure-of-greatness/

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1/29-Abraham Lincoln on Leadership

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January 29, 2009

Lincoln on Leadership: Strategies for Tough Times.

Best selling author Donald Phillips spoke at the Gerald R. Ford Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan, at an event organized by the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University.

Even before Abraham Lincoln’s inauguration, seven Southern states had seceded from the Union. Four more states would secede following the attack on Fort Sumter, taking all federal agencies, forts, and arsenals within their territory. To make matters worse, Lincoln, who was elected by a plurality of the popular vote, was viewed by his own advisors as nothing more than a gawky, second-rate, country lawyer with no leadership experience. Phillips examined the diverse leadership abilities that helped Lincoln succeed in tough times, and how they can be applied to our Unique challenges today.

http://hauensteincenter.org/abraham-lincoln-on-leadership/

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1/14-Meeting of the Leadership Academy – Chris Barbee

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January 14, 2009

Chris Barbee, director of alumni relations at Grand Valley State University, addressed the Hauenstein Center’s Leadership Academy on January 14, 2009.

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