For events prior to 2016, click here.

2016

11/18-Provost Gayle R. Davis—A Lifetime of Leadership Lessons: The Wheelhouse Talks #2

4PM, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St. W., Grand Rapids, MI 49504

 

Entering her final year as Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic and Student Affairs at Grand Valley, Gayle Davis will speak on her experiences and personal leadership insights from her life and career at GVSU.

During her fifteen-year tenure, Davis has led the academic community during the university’s marked growth. She has shepherded a major reorganization of the university, expanded interdisciplinary courses, created an interdisciplinary college, and fostered a redesign of student advising that has dramatically increased retention. Recognized in 2006 as one of the “50 Most Influential Women in West Michigan” by the Grand Rapids Business Journal, Davis earned her master’s and doctoral degrees from
Michigan State University.

11/1-Election Panel (Grand Rapids, MI)

7 PM, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St W, Grand Rapids, MI 49504

All too frequently, it appears that the presidential election cycle has left our public language coarse and rigid, our political coalitions badly fractured, and our outlets of news and opinion painfully inadequate for the difficult conversations and persistent challenges that lie ahead. In this season of boundless complexity and vociferous discontent, how can engaged citizens and students make sense of the bewildering political currents swirling all around them?

This event was the second of two panels on the upcoming presidential election, featuring faculty and staff from Grand Valley’s Department of Political Science, the Frederik Meijer Honors College, and the Division of University Relations. The panel will be chaired by Mark Richards, and commenters will include Polly Diven, Erika King, Matthew McLogan, and Jonathan White.

10/25-Election Panel (Allendale, MI)

5 PM, Cook-DeWitt Center, Grand Valley State University’s Allendale, MI Campus

Polls consistently show that two of every three Americans believe our country is on the wrong track. Not surprisingly, this presidential election cycle has disrupted old loyalties and challenged conventional wisdom. It has furrowed the brows of seasoned observers, and it has frustrated citizens of diverse cultural backgrounds and political persuasions.

However, with help from Grand Valley’s political experts, we do not have to remain perplexed. This was the first of two panels on the upcoming presidential election, featuring professors from Grand Valley’s Department of Political Science. The panel was chaired by Mark Richards, and commenters included Erika King, Laura Schneider, Darren Walhof, and Donald Zinman.

10/20-Ronald C. White: American Ulysses

7PM, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St W, Grand Rapids, MI 49504

By the late nineteenth century, Ulysses S. Grant — famous Civil War general and eighteenth President of the United States — was considered among the greatest leaders in American history. His Personal Memoirs, completed rapidly as he fought his last battle with cancer, were published by Mark Twain shortly after Grant’s death in 1885, to enduring acclaim.

During the twentieth century, evaluations of Grant’s legacy became more critical. In American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant, bestselling historian Ronald C. White mobilizes meticulous research and a masterful prose style to argue that the time is ripe for a fresh evaluation of Grant’s important contributions to American life. As a multidimensional portrait of an iconic nineteenth-century figure, American Ulysses attempts to set a new standard of excellence for Grant biographers.

The Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies was proud to partner with the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Library & Museum to host this keynote with Ronald C. White as he introduced his book, American Ulysses: A Life of Ulysses S. Grant.

For more information on this speaker please visit www.prhspeakers.com.

 

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10/7-Gleaves Whitney—Election 2016 & Beyond: What is to be Done? The Wheelhouse Talks #1

Gleaves Whitney — Election 2016 and Beyond: What Is to Be Done?

4 PM, Friday, October 7, 2016
Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center, 401 Fulton St. W., Grand Rapids, MI

During the course of Campaign 2016, three presidential candidates have exposed deep fissures and raw wounds in American society. Whether you were drawn to Trump, Clinton, or Sanders, each has attracted a sizeable portion of the electorate. The alt-right, progressives, socialists — they are here to stay. Because each candidate has painted a dramatically different ideal of twenty-first century America, questions arise: Is there any possible way for the three factions to work together with enough good will to find principled common ground? Or is the U.S. at an unprecedented impasse in postwar history? Will it be necessary for the political parties to reconstitute themselves in ways that better reflect our changing demographics and interests? In this Wheelhouse Talk the director of the Hauenstein Center, Gleaves Whitney, reflected on some lessons for emerging leaders seeking to grapple with a rapidly evolving (or devolving) political environment.

9/30-Rock the Vote

The Hauenstein Center is a proud co-sponsor of the Student Civic Assembly Week’s Rock the Vote concert.

Friday, September 30, 2016
5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Lubbers Stadium Pavilion

For more information, click here.

9/14-Akhil Reed Amar: The Constitution Today

Wednesday, September 14, 2016, at 7 PM
Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium
401 Fulton Street West, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49504

Few subjects of interest to journalists and scholars involve questions as large in scope, or as serious in consequence, as those surrounding constitutional law. Given the enormous intellectual stakes that hinge on the interpretation of America’s most important political document, it can be difficult for even the most informed citizens to understand fully the enduring influence of the Constitution on American politics and culture in the twenty-first century.

In honor of Constitution Day, the Hauenstein Center and the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Foundation, Library & Museum hosted distinguished legal scholar Akhil Reed Amar of Yale University. He discussed his book, The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of Our Era.

 

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9/8-Can We Find Common Ground Between Israel & Palestine?

An evening of respectful dialogue around one of the hardest questions facing our global community

7PM, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St. W., Grand Rapids, MI 49504

Even in this era of intense political polarization, few topics of debate elicit feelings as strong, or opinions as rigid, as the ongoing Israel-Palestine conflict. Defined by complex histories and clouded by an array of misunderstandings, it is a conflict in which shared understanding is elusive but certainly not impossible.

In partnership with the Kaufman Interfaith Institute, the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies was proud to host a respectful conversation on one of the most challenging questions facing the international community: can we find common ground between Israel and Palestine? Abdullah Antepli, imam and Chief Representative of Muslim Affairs at Duke University, joined Orthodox Rabbi Donniel Hartman, President of the Shalom Hartman Institute, for an evening of dialogue between two internationally renowned interfaith leaders.

 

 

Abdullah Antepli is Chief Representative of Muslim Affairs and was the first imam at Duke University. Antepli is the co-director of the Muslim Leadership Initiative which invites North American Muslims to engage in dialogue with the Jewish community in America and in Israel through the lens of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

 

Donniel Hartman is President of the Shalom Hartman Institute in Jerusalem, Orthodox rabbi, and author of Putting God Second: How to Save Religion from Itself. He has been a frequent presenter at the Kaufman Interfaith Institute’s sponsored Jewish-Christian-Muslim triennial dialogues.

 

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6/1-Finding the Lost Region 2016: Second Midwestern History Conference

Photo credits: Chris Paul (Robin), Bobak Ha’Eri (Lake Michigan), Bert Kaufmann (Willis Tower), Bev Sykes (St. Louis), Mactographer (Barn), Pan Krzyżówka (Zinnia Flower), and Rachel Kramer (Grand River)

Videos of the events are available below or as a full playlist here.

Midwestern History Conference
June 1, 2016
Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St. W.
Grand Rapids, MI
49504

Finding the Lost Region 2016: Second Midwestern History Conference

In spring 2015, the Hauenstein Center, in collaboration with the Midwestern History Association, hosted a Common Ground Summit on the history, culture, and art of the American Midwest. Our many speakers asked how the renewed study of the Midwest – a field long neglected by scholars and critics – might shed new light on the development of democracy, the expansion of industry, and the flourishing of pluralism in America.

On June 1, 2016, the Hauenstein Center and Midwestern History Association hosted a continuation of that summit. Committed to the discussion of the Midwest as “America’s Most Common Ground,” our conference featured historians, literary scholars, and cultural critics who are dedicated to rebuilding the field of Midwestern studies. A significant theme of our conversations was the synergy between the revival of Midwestern history and intellectual history in academic discourse. Ultimately, our conference advocated for greater attention to Midwestern history among professional historians, contributed to rebuilding the infrastructure necessary for the study of the American Midwest, and promoted greater academic discourse relating to Midwestern history.

Keynote speakers and discussants included Andrew Seal (Yale University), John Wunder (University of Nebraska-Lincoln), Kathy Borkowski (Wisconsin Historical Society Press), Kelly D. Mezurek (Walsh University), John E. Miller (South Dakota State University), and Jon Lauck (Midwestern History Association).

Panels covered topics as varied as the political history of the 18th century Midwest to the contemporary literature of the Rust Belt. Speakers came from universities across the Midwest and nation.

“Thank you very much for a first rate conference on June 1st. It was of very high calibre….[The panel on the Midwest and the civil war was] truly outstanding, one of the best panels I have heard in attending conferences in the past 45 years.”
~James E. Davis on “Finding the Lost Region 2016: Second Midwestern History Conference”
Professor Emeritus at Illinois College

 

Videos and Schedule

9 AM – 10 AM

Plenary: Andrew Seal, Yale University: ”The Regrowth of American Thought: Midwestern and Intellectual Histories after the Age of Fracture.”

10:15 – 11:45 AM: First Panel Session

Panel 1: American Indians and Westward Expansion—Chair: Edward Frantz

“Dakotas, ABCFM Missionaries, and Conflicting uses of Literacy, 1863-1866,” Linda Clemmons, Illinois State University

“Simon Pokagon, Chicago History, and the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893,” Lisa Cushing-Davis, Loyola University Chicago

“Decolonizing Landscape, Sacralizing Trauma, and Commemorations of the U.S. – Dakota War Hangings,” Wayne Ratzlaff, Waubonsee Community College

Panel 2: Defining the Midwest: Nostalgia, “Midwestern Values,” and Ethnoreligious Identity—Chair: Matthew Daley

“Midwestern Stereotypes: Nostalgia? or Another Way of Looking at Things?” John E. Miller, South Dakota State University

“‘Where People and Things Wear Out’: Masculinity, Rural Time, and the Midwestern Farm Novel,” Andy Oler, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

“Selling Modern Gadgets with Nostalgia: Creating Midwestern Consumers at the 1939 New York World’s Fair,” Patricia Oman, Hastings College

“Faithful Narratives: Dutch-American Identity in the Midwest After World War II,” David Zwart, Grand Valley State University

Panel 3: Toward an Intellectual History of the Midwest—Chair: Jon Lauck

“John Barlow Martin and the Path of a Midwestern Public Intellectual” Ray E. Boomhower, Interim Senior Director, Indiana Historical Society Press

“What is ‘Middlewestishness’? The Evolution of Midwestern Literary Studies” Sara Kosiba, Associate Professor at Troy University

“The Hope of the Founders: The Upper Midwest as the Second Promised Land,” Gleaves Whitney, Grand Valley State University

Panel 4: The Midwest in the Long 19th Century—Chair: James E. Davis

“Unchristian Politics: The Anti-Masonic Movement and the Greenbacks, 1868-1888,” Michael Davis, Northwest Florida State College

“James Smith’s Account and the Significance of the Captivity Narrative,” William Heath, Mt. St. Mary’s University

“The Distribution and Origins of African Americans in the Old Northwest, 1800-1850,” Gregory S. Rose, The Ohio State University at Marion

12 – 1:45 PM

Luncheon Plenary: John Wunder, University of Nebraska-Lincoln: “Mapping Out Midwestern Studies.”

2 – 3:30 PM: Second Panel Session

Panel 5: Politics and Pluralism in the Midwest—Chair: John E. Miller

“Unlike Partners: James Brown, Richard Lugar, and Republicanism in the Midwest,” Edward Frantz, University of Indianapolis

“Was Midwestern Progressivism Different? Merlin Hull and the Wisconsin Progressive Tradition,” William Kostlevy, Brethren Historical Library and Archives

“A Triumph of Conservatism: Lincoln, Lane, and the Election of 1860 in Indiana,” Gregory Peek, Pennsylvania State University

“The Midwest as Seedbed of Cultural Pluralism: Jane Addams, Horace Kallen, and the Urban and Rural Sources of an Idea, 1900-1920,” Michael C. Steiner, California State University, Fullerton

Panel 6: Mapping the Midwest: Lakes, Rivers, and Wilderness—Chair: Gregory S. Rose

“‘A Fully Accredited Ocean’: Including the Great Lakes in Midwestern History,” Matthew L. Daley, Grand Valley State University

“Wisconsin as Boat-Building Center,” Andreas Jordahl Rhude, Antique & Classic Boat Society

“The Place of St. Louis in the Geography of the Historical Imagination,” Thomas Kivi, St. Louis University

Panel 7: Going Glocal: Shifting Master Narratives Through Grand Rapids Women’s History—Chair: Jo Ellyn Clarey

“Mining the Mother Lode: WWI Women’s Registration Cards and the Council of National Defense,” Anita Anthony-VanOrsdal, Michigan State University

“Fighting Faulty Assumptions about 1890s Women’s Groups, Black and White,” Jo Ellyn Clarey, Greater Grand Rapids Women’s History Council

“Creating a Resource: A Unique Record of Women’s Elective History,” Deirdre Toeller-Novak, Greater Grand Rapids Women’s History Council

Panel 8: The Literary History of the Midwest—Chair: Patricia Oman

“Reading the Rust Belt: 1991-2016,” Danielle Cope, Grand Valley State University

“The Memoirs of Union soldiers from Midwestern States as Travel Literature,” James E. Davis, Illinois College

“The Space and Place of Northern Plains Writers,” Joshua Preston, Baylor College of Medicine

3:45 – 5:15 PM: Third Panel Session

Panel 9: The Political (and Radical) Midwest—Chair: Paul V. Murphy

“Beyond Utopia: The American Socialists and the Reimagining of the Public Sphere,” Wesley R. Bishop, Purdue University

“A Frenchwoman in the City: Jenny P. d’Héricourt in Chicago, 1863-1873,” Michelle M. Campbell, Purdue University

“Tammany Farmer: The Al Smith Presidential Campaign and Midwestern Politics of the 1920s,” Jason K. Duncan, Aquinas College

Panel 10: The Midwest and the Civil War—Chair: Linda Clemmons

“‘The Only Bridge that Spans the Chasm Dividing Us from Our Homes’: Communicability, Connectivity, and the Experience of Separation during the Civil War,” L. Bao Bui, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

“The Crusade of Black Midwesterners for Citizenship Rights,” Leonne M. Hudson, Kent State University

“‘I Have Seen More since I Left Home than I Ever Supposed There was in the World’: Black Soldiers, Midwestern Community Correspondence, and the Civil War,” Kelly D. Mezurek, Walsh University

Panel 11: Narratives of Midwestern Women: 1930-1980—Chair: Sara Kosiba

“History of the Humble: The Lived Experience of Midwestern Women, 1930-1980,” Alexa Giebink, Gustavus Adolphus College

“‘If the situation seemed insurmountable, I always wanted to be there’: Virginia Coffey, A Midwest Human Relations Pioneer,” Phillip J. Obermiller and Thomas E. Wagner, University of Cincinnati

Panel 12: Civic Identity in the Midwest—Chair: Wayne Ratzlaff

“Anti-Semitism in the Ozarks: How Glenn Frazier Miller’s Murders Are Reflected in Local Communities,” Mara W. Cohen Ioannides, Missouri State University

“The Syrians of Sioux Falls, Circa 1927,” Stephen R. Cusulos

“A ‘Self-Made’ Town: Semi-Annual Furniture Expositions and the Construction of Civic Identity in Grand Rapids, 1878-1965,” Scott Richard St. Louis, Grand Valley State University

“Communists, Caltrops, and Collusion: The Clinton Corn Strike (1979-1980) Oral History Project,” Brad Wiles, Clinton Public Library

Panel 13: What’s the Midwest Got to Do With It? Pecans Punk Rock, and Perestroika—Chair: David McMahon

“Mikhail Gorbachev’s Saint Paul Summit and the Construction of a New Midwestern Identity,” Cory Haala, Marquette University

“Reclaiming the Pecan’s Roots,” Catherine Lambrecht, Greater Midwest Foodways Alliance and Highland Park Historical Society

“‘Don’t Need No Pretty Face’: The Forgotten Midwestern Origins of the Punk Rock Movement,” Rachael Price, University of Arkansas

5:30 – 7 PM

Reception

7 – 8 PM

Plenary Panel: The Future of Midwestern History

Discussants: Kathy Borkowski (Wisconsin Historical Society Press), Kelly D. Mezurek (Walsh University), John E. Miller (South Dakota State University), and John Wunder (University of Nebraska-Lincoln).

Chair: Jon Lauck (Midwestern History Association).

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5/19-5/20-The Hidden Wounds of War

The Hidden Wounds of War
Richard M. DeVos Center, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium
Thursday, May 19, 2016 and Friday, May 20, 2016

 

 

The Hauenstein Center is proud to be a continuing co-sponsor, along with the Michigan Military PTSD Task Force, RiverView Psychological Services P.S., the West Michigan Veterans Coalition, Grand Valley State Universtiy, Forest View Hospital, and the American Legion, for the conference series “The Hidden Wounds of War.” This conference is free and open to the public.

We are proud to honor Ralph Hauenstein’s military leadership by supporting these organizations and their efforts to help those who have served our country. Information about the event is below:

4/27-Peter C. Cook Leadership Academy Graduation and Keynote by ADM James M. Loy

On April 28, 2016, the Hauenstein Center proudly celebrated its graduating Peter C. Cook Leadership Academy fellows. The night included a keynote by ADM James M. Loy, who received the Hauenstein Center’s highest honor, the COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship, at the ceremony. For more information about the Cook Leadership Academy, click here, and for more information about the COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship or about ADM Loy, click here.

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4/15-4/17-Progressive/Conservative

Listen to Gleaves Whitney and Joseph Hogan discuss Progressive/Conservative on the WGVU Morning Show with Shelley Irwin.

Hosted as part of the Hauenstein Center’s Common Ground Initiative, in partnership with the Kate and Richard Wolters Foundation, the Russell Kirk Center for Cultural Renewal, and the Progressive Women’s Alliance of West Michigan, “Progressive/Conservative” will bring together thought leaders from the left and right, and from inside and outside the academy, to discuss how the collision of progressivism and conservatism in America shapes, has shaped, and will continue to shape our national identity.

Americans have ample reason to think deeply and critically about the roots of progressivism, conservatism, and the various ways the two have interacted in history. Today, the widening gap between the left and right, as well as the fractures inside the Democratic and Republican parties, have caused widespread political confusion and upheaval. Ideological gridlock dominates the headlines, while reasoned and substantive political discussion often devolves into talking-head repartee and triumphalist chest thumping.

In this age of crippling ideological polarization, the time is ripe for a reexamination, and even redefinition, of what it means to be progressive, and what it means to be conservative, in the 21st century. Our summit will provide a rigorous setting for political thought leaders, humanities scholars, and engaged citizens to discuss the ways in which progressives and conservatives might share common ground and common cause—historically, culturally, philosophically.

Event Videos

Friday, April 15

7-8:30 PM: Michael Ignatieff on politics and the humanities

Saturday, April 16

8-9 AM: Kevin M. Schultz on William F. Buckley and Norman Mailer

9:15-10:30: Claire Rydell Arcenas on John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor Mill and Judy Whipps on John Dewey and Jane Addams

10:45-Noon: Benjamin Lockerd on T.S. Eliot, Bradley J. Birzer on Russell Kirk, and Lisa Szefel on Peter Viereck

12:30-1:30 PM: George H. Nash on the conservative intellectual movement in America

1:45-3: Natalia Mehlman Petrzela on the culture wars in education, Raymond J. Haberski, Jr. on just war and civil religion, and Paul Murphy on early twentieth-century humanism

3:15-4:30: Paul D. Moreno on progressives and the administrative state and Kevin Mattson on contemporary distrust between progressives and conservatives

6-7:30: E.J. Dionne, Jr. and David Hollinger discuss common ground between liberal Protestants and secular liberals


Sunday, April 17

11 AM: Andrew Hartman and Christopher Shannon debate the culture wars

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Testimonials

“The criteria that I have for accepting invitations of this kind is [whether or not] I think that the question that I’m being asked is really interesting and important. I want to publicly celebrate the Hauenstein Center and Gleaves Whitney in particular for this initiative. The search for common ground is incredibly important.”

~Michael Ignatieff, former leader of the Liberal Party of Canada

“It’s a great honor, and I should say that when I received the kind invitation to be here I first thought, ‘okay, talking about progressivism and conservatism, that’s interesting, but not totally path breaking,’ but then I thought, ‘Wait, with progressives AND conservatives on the stage and in the room? There’s something new. I think it’s quite telling that that’s such an exciting prospect and that it has to be so deliberate for us to come together to have these discussions. It only intensifies the honor that I feel to be here.”

~Natalia Mehlman Petrzela, Assistant Professor of History at The New School

“What a pleasure and honor it was to participate in the Progressive/Conservative 2016 Summit. I learned a lot and met some wonderful people. More than that, I was inspired by the initiative and good spirit that everyone brought. It all went seamlessly, which speaks to an impressive team collaboration and professionalism. I hope our paths cross again.”

~Lisa Szefel, Associate Professor of History at Pacific University

“I wanted to thank you and your entire staff for such a terrific weekend of discussion, debate, and sustained engagement. I can’t remember a conference weekend when I have learned so much and felt that the conversations between speakers and an audience were so thoughtful and important. It was truly an honor and a privilege to participate. Thank you so much for the invitation to speak and for everything you did to make the summit possible. I am eager to follow the Hauenstein Center’s events closely in the future.”

~Claire Rydell Arcenas, PhD Candidate at Stanford University

4/8-Leader Lab Spring 2016

In our Leader Lab series, our Cook Leadership Academy fellows explore the connections between leadership and their own experiences. These fellows then speak about their experiences to the full cohort, giving the speakers an opportunity to gain valuable public speaking experience while also encouraging other fellows to examine the leadership path in their own lives. This semester’s Leader Lab featured Thomas Walters, Julie Cole, and Megan Rodawold.

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3/23-Luncheon with Aziz Abu Sarah

Aziz Abu Sarah is the cofounder of MEJDI Tours, a tour company focused on teaching a plurality of perspectives which often operates in Israel and Palestine. The Hauenstein Center, along with The Frederik Meijer Honors College, was proud to sponsor this event hosted by the Kaufman Interfaith Institute. Below is audio of a luncheon wherein Aziz discussed common ground, empathy, and ethical tourism in Israel and Palestine.

3/18-Kate Pew Wolters: The Wheelhouse Talks

Title: The Wheelhouse Talks: Kate Pew Wolters
3:30-4:30, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St W, Grand Rapids, MI 49504

Kate Pew Wolters is a graduate of Aquinas College and of Michigan State University, where she earned a master’s degree in social work. Her tireless efforts on behalf of individuals with disabilities have made her a familiar presence in West Michigan’s philanthropic community. Kate is president and co-founder of the Kate and Richard Wolters Foundation, which supports non-profits for education, social justice, individuals with disabilities, and the arts.

As a two-time appointee to the GVSU Board of Trustees, Kate demonstrated exemplary leadership at a time of remarkable growth at the university. Join us as Kate Pew Wolters presents our final Wheelhouse Talk of the 2015-2016 academic year.

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3/16-Alan Charles Kors: The Legacy of Enlightenment and the Heart of Academic Freedom

Title: Alan Charles Kors: The Legacy of the Enlightenment and the Heart of Academic Freedom
7PM, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St W, Grand Rapids, MI 49504

University campuses occupy an important space in American cultural life. At their best, our nation’s campuses provide common ground on which issues of world-historical importance—from war and empire, to race, class, and gender—can be debated. For that reason, we often take for granted the prevalence and security of academic freedom and open debate on college campuses. Recently, however, these essential virtues of university life have been put to the test.

In his keynote address, Alan Charles Kors, acclaimed intellectual historian and Henry Charles Lea Professor of History at the University of Pennsylvania, reminded us that the principles of free speech and open debate did not always exist; rather, they have significant roots in the Enlightenment. A 2005 recipient of the National Humanities Medal, Professor Kors revealed how the legacy of the Enlightenment, the principle of academic freedom, and the purpose of open debate are inextricably intertwined.

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Relevant Works by Alan Charles Kors

Encyclopedia of the Enlightenment (Excerpt)

The Essential Relationship of Academic Freedom to Human Liberty

On the Sadness of Higher Education

2/18-H.W. Brands: Reagan: The Life

Title: H.W. Brands: Reagan: The Life
7PM, LV Eberhard Center, Room 215
301 Fulton St W, Grand Rapids, MI 49504

Reagan’s legacy is a fiercely contested one. In Reagan: The Life, H.W. Brands follows his subject from humble beginnings in small-town Illinois to fame on the silver screen and power in the Oval Office. Employing archival sources not available to previous biographers, Brands has crafted a richly detailed and fascinating narrative of Reagan’s presidency, which ushered in a new presidential age—the age of Reagan—whose effects are still powerfully felt today.

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2/12-Brian Flanagan: The Wheelhouse Talks

Title: The Wheelhouse Talks: Brian Flanagan
3:30-4:00, Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium, Richard M. DeVos Center
401 Fulton St W, Grand Rapids, MI 49504

Brian Flanagan, a graduate of Notre Dame and GVSU, is the former associate director of the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies and co-founder of the Cook Leadership Academy and its Wheelhouse Talks series.

Under Flanagan’s direction, the Sanger Leadership Center at the University of Michigan provides thought leadership and high-impact, experience-based learning initiatives that serve Michigan alumni and more than 3,000 students.

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Slide Presentation

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2/8-Ambassador John Beyrle Receives COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship

On Monday, February 8, the Hauenstein Center was proud to confer its highest honor, the COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship, to Ambassador John Beyrle. John Beyrle served as an American diplomat for three decades, in foreign postings and domestic assignments focused on Central and Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union, and Russia. After his appointment to Bulgaria (2005-’08), he was appointed as ambassador to Russia (2008-’12). During the latter assignment he helped implement policies that led to improved US-Russian relations, highlighted by the signing of the START nuclear arms reduction treaty, Russia’s accession to the World Trade Organization, and liberalized visa and travel protocols.

 

 

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COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (1)

COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (2)

COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (3)

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COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (7)

COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (8)

COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (9)

COL Ralph W. Hauenstein Fellowship (10)

1/22-Rebekah Warren: The Wheelhouse Talks

January 22, 2016: Rebekah Warren: The Wheelhouse Talks
3:30-4:30PM Charles W. Loosemore Auditorium,
Richard M. DeVos Center 401 Fulton St. W.

Sen. Rebekah Warren represents citizens from the 18th MI Senate district. Seen as one of the most liberal members of the Michigan Senate, she is unique in reaching across the aisle to champion bipartisan legislation on human rights and the environment. In the Senate, she has shepherded bills strengthening human trafficking laws, negotiated legislation banning Great Lakes water diversion, and represented Michigan on the Great Lakes Commission.

 

 

 

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Videos

Rebekah Warren: The Wheelhouse Talks

Gleaves Whitney on Ralph Hauenstein’s Life and Passing

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