January 29, 2003

Boston Globe

40 years after those 6.9 seconds in Dallas,by Mark Feeney - Nov. 22
“Forty years ago today, John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Anyone much over 45 remembers hearing the news and the absolute shock of it. How to describe to anyone much under 45 what that experience was like? The obvious comparison is with Sept. 11, 2001 — except for this difference. Before 9/11, there had been the Kennedy assassination. Before the Kennedy assassination, there had been nothing.”

Margaret H. Marshall - Op-Ed - Nov. 22
“The telephone rang in my Johannesburg home. “Have you heard?” The news struck as a thunderbolt rolling across the South African skies. Word of mouth. In 1963, South Africa had no television, and the apartheid government controlled the official state radio. Details of the assassination were hard to come by — President John F. Kennedy was no friend of the apartheid government. But to the antiapartheid forces in South Africa he was a hero, a powerful symbol to us that America’s commitment to liberty and justice for all was no longer an empty slogan. And for me, his death felt personal.”

Shedding light on movies about a dark day in Dallas, by Glenn Lovell - Nov. 21
“It’s something to consider as we prepare to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the shooting — once recalled as The Day Camelot Died — and we look back on Hollywood dramatizations, past and present, intended and coincidental.”

JFK’s November, an Op/Ed by James Carroll - Nov. 18
“The chill wind from the north has come. The days fall into darkness with premature finality. Now begins the season that first made human beings afraid of the year. The rotations and revolutions of the Earth define the very limits of existence, the controls of light and warmth, yet no direct perception of these movements is possible. Indeed, your daily perception — that the sun is the thing that moves from dawn to dusk — is unreliable, or so science tells you. And now the seasonal evidence is equally perplexing. In the northern climes, this is the time of what seems the sun’s retreat. Yet it is only the arc of Earth’s rotation? Never mind. As the sharp green leaves once turned to follow the sun’s course in the sky (the leaves believe it moves), so the winter soul adjusts itself for dark.”

A history lesson with Kennedy at its core, by Sam Allis - Nov. 17
“And there is nothing breathtaking in ‘JFK: A Presidency Revealed’ for the close, or even casual, reader of history. It is an able, well-written effort best suited to younger generations who have barely heard of the man. Even the astonishing litany of the man’s medical maladies and the drugs he took for them is already in the public domain, thanks to historian Robert Dallek. (Kennedy was given last rites three times during the 1950s.) Kennedy’s womanizing is old news.”

Capturing Kennedy, by Thom Powers - Nov. 17
“Americans can’t get enough of going behind the scenes — whether it’s into the fictionalized Washington of HBO’s ‘K Street,’ the rock`n’roll household of ‘The Osbournes,’ or the huddles of NBA basketball teams. But 40 years ago, such intimate access — and the technology that enabled it — were brand-new. When a young Life magazine reporter named Robert Drew told John F. Kennedy that he wanted to film the junior senator’s every move during a week of his presidential campaign, the proposal was unprecedented. By consenting to Drew’s pitch, the media-savvy candidate fostered the creation of two remarkabe documentaries.”

Programs look back on that fateful day, by Suzanne C. Ryan - Nov. 16
“Tonight marks the start of an extended TV observance of the 40th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination. Will we learn anything new? Perhaps only that, to this day, no one knows exactly what happened, but everyone’s aware that it was momentous.”

JFK holiday necessary? by Adrian Walker - Nov. 10
“So now comes a proposal to honor the memory of John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States and the last one from Massachusetts. Politically, it’s probably the most palatable holiday one could propose. Even questioning it seems nearly churlish.”

ABC probes JFK assassination, by David Bauder - Oct. 28
“ABC News said yesterday it has conducted an exhaustive investigation of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, complete with a computer-generated reconstruction that irrefutably confirms Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. A two-hour special on the event is scheduled to air Nov. 20, two days before the 40th anniversary of the killing.”

Baltimore Sun
40 years ago, NFL chose to play after JFK 
Nov. 23 (AP)
“Forty years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, NFL owners remember how two pro football leagues reacted differently to the horror of events in Dallas that day. In 1963, there was a spirited battle going on between the established NFL, led by commissioner Pete Rozelle, and the upstart AFL, with medal of honor winner Joe Foss in charge.”

Oswald sought notice, brother says Nov. 23 (AP)
“The shooting of President John F. Kennedy was not a political conspiracy but an almost spontaneous act by a troubled man who wanted attention, the brother of Lee Harvey Oswald says.”

Turn of the tide, by Gerald P. Merrell -  Nov. 22
“To many, though, today’s 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy is not about the images that flickered across television screens, or even about one man; it’s a reminder of a period, both exhilarating and dreadful, that began with so much seeming possible, and ended with unimaginable violence.”

A history of independence, by Marego Athans - Nov. 22
“The darts started flying 40 years ago, when the young assistant district attorney serving on the Warren Commission came up with the “single-bullet theory,” leading to the conclusion that a lone gunman assassinated President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Assassination brought a tragic Thanksgiving, by Frederick N. Rasmussen - Nov. 22
“In the numbing, almost unbearable, grief that gripped the nation in the days following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Americans faced Thanksgiving week with heavy hearts.”

Reasons to run JFK complex and varied, by Candus Thomson - Nov. 21
“Kennedy was the spark for the first race, in April 1963. He challenged the Marines to finish a 50-mile hike in 14 hours, a test established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt.”

Time for the truth, Op-Ed by Jerry McKnight - Nov. 21
“The report and its 26 volumes of hearings and exhibits, with 17,000 pages of testimony and more than 10 million words, initially were celebrated as the most comprehensive investigation in history. The commission concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald alone assassinated JFK – there was no domestic or foreign conspiracy behind the tragedy in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

In Trauma Room 1 with JFK, by Frank D. Roylance - Nov. 21
“After 40 years it has become a tired truism that anyone old enough to remember the assassination of President John F. Kennedy can remember clearly where they were and what they were doing when they first heard the news from Dallas.”

An examination of Kennedy’s life, by David Zurawik - Nov. 15
“Given television’s fondness for sex and violence, it’s no surprise that in the coming weeks, dozens of programs mark the 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s death by emphasizing two things: his assignations with women and his assassination in Dallas.”

Chicago Sun-Times

Today’s youngsters ask: Why was JFK shot? by Kris Axtman - Nov. 22
“Seventh-graders Samantha Block and Julia Ferguson have spent the last few weeks watching videos on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. They’ve written poems on their feelings about the day that shook their hometown — and the nation — 40 years ago; they’ve even interviewed people who were alive when Kennedy was killed. And now, after touring the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, they say they kind of get it.”

When an 8-year-old watched his first murder, Column by Mark Brown - Nov. 18
“This month’s copy of the Irish American News landed in my box at work last week with an attention-grabbing cover photo: a black-and-white of John F. Kennedy standing in the back seat of a limousine amidst a crowd of people.”

Kennedy honors slain brothers Nov. 17
“Sen. Edward M. Kennedy remembered his slain brothers Sunday, saying he felt loss, but also inspiration, when thinking of them.”

The rifle that killed JFK, by Andrew Herrmann - Nov. 16
“This time of year, around the anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Chicago sporting goods magnate Milton P. Klein would grow moody. For he could not help but be reminded of his awful place in history as the man who sold Lee Harvey Oswald the rifle used to kill JFK.”

Photos evoke memories of day JFK died, by Bill Cunniff - Nov. 14
“Aurora resident Michael Sawdey was a sophomore at the University of Michigan in 1963. On Nov. 22, as he was emerging from the darkroom after processing film for the school yearbook, television was reporting the shocking news that President Kennedy had been shot.”

Chicago Tribune

Warhol puts focus on JFK’s assassination, by Michael Kilian - Nov. 23
“In an exhibition opening this weekend, Pittsburgh’s Andy Warhol Museum expands upon that connection with a wealth of visual and archival material from The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, housed in the Dallas book depository from which Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired the bullets that killed Kennedy 40 years ago.”

The Grassy Knoll Society, by Jason Krause - Nov. 18
“Ten years ago, around the 30th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, things seemed to be going pretty well for conspiracy buffs. Oliver Stone’s movie “JFK” had come out a few years earlier, re-igniting interest in the event and stoking the dying flames of the conspiracy industry. The movie even helped goad Congress to pass a law declassifying all assassination-related records. Almost every major publication had anniversary stories of some sort, and public opinion surveys indicated that a solid majority of the public did not believe the official theory that Lee Harvey Oswald alone shot the president.”

JFK’s legacy lost amid many questions, by Charles M. Madigan - Nov. 16
“The dominant thought in the late 1950s was that nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union was a distinct possibility. Moscow had taken the advantage in space with Sputnik, which panicked the Western world. Nikita Khrushchev, Stalin’s successor, was in no way benign. The Kremlin had the weapons and the rockets to deliver them.”

Christian Science Monitor

The Kennedy legacy, by Daniel Schorr - Nov. 21
“According to the latest Census, a majority of Americans – 57.5 percent, to be exact – are under 40 years of age. Thus, most Americans have no personal memory of that fateful day of Nov. 22, 1963, when President Kennedy was assassinated. For this generation, names like Lee Harvey Oswald and the Warren Commission are merely trivia quiz questions.”

JFK assassination: its evolving hold on the national psyche, by Kris Axtman - Nov. 21
“Seventh-graders Samantha Block and Julia Ferguson have spent the past few weeks watching videos on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. They’ve written poems on their feelings about the day that shook their hometown – and the nation – 40 years ago; they’ve even interviewed people who were alive when Kennedy was killed. And now, after touring the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, they say they kind of get it.”

How Dallas came to terms with tragedy, by Hal Smith - Nov. 20
“The gunfire that felled President John Kennedy 40 years ago on Saturday was an event so searing that millions of people, not just in America but worldwide, can still recall in vivid detail the moment they learned the news. Almost lost in that moment is the fact that those bullets left other casualties in Dallas that day and caused grave injury to the standing of the city itself.”

Dallas Morning News

A city under the spotlight, by David Flick - Nov. 21
“Interest in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, which has waxed and waned over the 40 years since his murder in Dallas, has reached an intensity this year unmatched in two decades.”

In a flash, joy turned into grief, by Steve Blow - Nov. 21
” It’s hard to imagine that this humble building was once one of the grandest structures in all of Dallas. But on a beautiful autumn noonday, exactly 40 years ago tomorrow, it was the epicenter of Dallas pride. It was where President John F. Kennedy was to address an enormous luncheon of Dallas dignitaries. Gifts for Caroline and John-John were on hand. A welcoming delegation stood at the ready.”

Pain lingers for Tippit’s widow, by Michael Granberry - Nov. 21
“For the widow of Dallas police Officer J.D. Tippit, the hardest weeks came just after the murder. Curtis, her youngest, would sit by the window night after night, wondering when Daddy was coming home. It was small consolation to a 5-year-old boy that his father was killed doing a job he loved. Or that his death at the hands of Lee Harvey Oswald led to the capture of President John F. Kennedy’s apparent assassin.”

JFK’s death remains most stunning event for this reporter, by Carl P. Leubsdorf - Nov. 21
“Forty years later, I can still recall my sense of shock as I recognized that the frantic words coming out of my bedroom radio told of the assassination of a president.”

The murder that wouldn’t die, by Karen Patterson - Nov. 17
“The killing of John F. Kennedy left a deep and stunning gash in the national psyche. Who President Kennedy was, what he represented, and the optimism of his era made his slaying psychologically personal to much of the nation.Beneath that scar, mistrust and disillusionment still fester products of a profound national grief, the mystery surrounding the murder, and nagging notions of what might have been.”

Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Reporting a tragic day in Fort Worth and Dallas, by Jack B. Tinsley - Nov. 22
“Nov. 22, 1963, was a day of days in a 27-year-old reporter’s life. The historic events and the news coverage in which I participated in Fort Worth and Dallas seem almost as vivid now as they did 40 years ago.”

JFK’s legacy, by Bill Miller - Nov. 22
“As hundreds of people poured into Dealey Plaza on Friday to reflect on the assassination of John F. Kennedy, three men who knew him intimately recalled how he lived.”

Crowds honor Kennedy, leave mementos, by Bill Miller - Nov. 22
“The sorrowful, the sincere and the silly poured into Dealey Plaza on Saturday to observe the 40th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination.”

Memories of JFK, by Eva-Marie Ayala - Nov. 22
“A young girl waited late into the evening at Carswell Air Force Base in Fort Worth to shake the hand of the arriving president. An eighth-grader who met him the next morning was especially interested in his shoes.”

City’s gift to Kennedy is unaccounted for, by Bud Kennedy - Nov. 22
“No souvenir has ever symbolized Fort Worth and Texas like the Shady Oak Western hat, given to nine presidents since 1923 in a tradition begun by Star-Telegram Publisher Amon G. Carter Sr. We gave Kennedy a Western hat at the morning breakfast at the Hotel Texas, now the Radisson Plaza Fort Worth.”

Kennedy photos displayed at Sixth Floor Museum, by Penny Cockerell - Nov. 21 (AP)
“One frame shows John F. Kennedy putting on socks while aboard his family’s private plane. In the next shot, he’s napping with a mask over his eyes. Another frame shows his arrival at an Oregon airport to about a half-dozen greeters on the tarmac.”

Assassination anniversary to bring crowds to Dealey Plaza, by Billy Miller - Nov. 21
“The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, 411 Elm St., will be the site of much of the activity. Lee Harvey Oswald is believed to have shot Kennedy from a sixth-floor window of the building, which then served as the Texas School Book Depository.”

JFK assassination theories continue to thrive, by John Austin - Nov. 21
“Forty years after his death, nowhere is the memory of John F. Kennedy more alive than in the ongoing drama over who killed him and why.”

Stitches In Time, by Allyson Reynolds Dixon - Nov. 21
“After John Kennedy’s death in 1963, a pair of North Central Texas women decided to preserve his memory using thread and patches of cloth. Ruth Buckhanan and Frances Harris sewed and pieced a quilt memorializing Kennedy’s life and death, completing the project titled ‘A Texas Quilt for JFK’ in 1966.”

Kennedy tribute has ‘Mass’ appeal, by Wayne Lee Gay - Nov. 21
“Forty years to the day after John F. Kennedy fell to an assassin’s bullet in Dallas, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra will commemorate the event with a performance of the eclectic theater piece written in the late president’s honor by his friend Leonard Bernstein in 1971.”

Inspiration, anyone? by Linda Campbell - Nov. 20
“Word about the assassination traveled across our dusty playground in a gruesome way, with a boorish boy playfully mimicking being shot in the head. His rude re-enactment was mystifying until we were called back to our classrooms, where the nuns told us that the president was dead.”

History Channel errs with ‘outrageous’ assassination series, by Bud Kennedy - Nov. 20
“The network’s publicity announcement for The Guilty Men, one of several new episodes of the what-if series The Men Who Killed Kennedy, said the show is focused on the ‘darkest and most challenging area’ of the assassination.”

40 years later, Valenti says JFK assassination ‘seared’ in memory, by Sharon Theimer - Nov. 20

“Jack Valenti, who was riding six cars back in President Kennedy’s motorcade, didn’t hear the gunfire. But when the car in front of him suddenly sped off, he knew something was wrong.”

Historians see similarities, differences in Kennedy, Bush, by Bobby Ross Jr. - Nov. 18
“A product of elite Eastern schools, he had won the presidency three years before in one of the closest elections in history. The losing candidate had been the other party’s two-term vice president, who appeared stiff on television.”

Experts: Presidency more difficult after Kennedy, by Bobby Ross Jr. - Nov. 18
“Not only is the scrutiny more intense in an era of 24-hour news channels and constantly updated Web sites, but public respect for the office has diminished.”

Ford stands behind Warren findings, by Bill Miller - Nov. 17
“The only surviving member of the Warren Commission stands by the panel’s conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, though he says he’s open to the possibility that new evidence might show there was a conspiracy.”

Conspiracy theories abound 40 years after Kennedy’s death, by Penny Cockerell - Nov. 16
“Thousands of books and 40 years later, the theories about President John F. Kennedy’s assassination keep coming. As do the conspiracy theorists, with their volumes of research, meetings around the country and busy Internet chat rooms.”

List of some conspiracy theories surrounding assassination - (AP) Nov. 16
“Here are a few of the unconventional conspiracy theories surrounding John F. Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Image is everything, by Ken Parish Perkins - Nov. 16
“John F. Kennedy’s eyes were small and piercing, his hair dark and thick. From the side, his head looked square, sort of like a block of ice; his nose was irregular at the tip, his chin strong and circular in a way that made men who stood next to him appear weak. Kennedy’s face was often pale, the skin of a person who rarely ventured outdoors, yet the pallor was never particularly disconcerting because images of football-tossing Kennedys gave the impression of a vigorous man.”

It’s not just a car — it’s a piece of history, by Bud Kennedy - Nov. 11
“The item: the white 1963 Lincoln convertible from the presidential motorcade that took Kennedy from a Fort Worth hotel to board a fateful flight to Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Houston Chronicle

Connally book gives personal view of Kennedy assassination, by Fritz Lanham - Nov. 15
“For those old enough to remember, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the wounding of Texas Gov. John Connally in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have become like part of our DNA, an event that burrowed into the marrow, ever after defining a part of us.”

Neurosurgeon shares his memories of JFK, by Ken Hoffman - Nov. 14
“He cradled John F. Kennedy’s head and turned it, parting the president’s hair so that he could examine the wound caused by an assassin’s bullet on that unforgettable day in Dallas, almost four decades ago.”

Indianapolis Star

In home state, focus is kept on JFK’s life, by Karen Testa -  (APNov. 16
“Perhaps it’s out of respect for a family that has endured repeated tragedies. Perhaps it’s because the shock — though four decades old — remains fresh in so many memories. Perhaps it’s because life is easier to celebrate than death.”

‘Stop the presses!’ newsman shouted, by Don Baker - Nov. 15
“Managing Editor Irving Leibowitz, whose desk was on the other side of the machine, and I watched in horror as the teletype interrupted a routine story in midsentence with these words: BULLETIN PRECEDE KENNEDY DALLAS, NOV. 22 (UPI) — THREE SHOTS WERE FIRED TODAY AT PRESIDENT KENNEDY’S MOTORCADE IN DOWNTOWN DALLAS. Leibo and I were quickly joined at the machine by Frank Widner, assistant managing editor. Then one of them shouted the words I had heard before only in the movies: ‘Stop the presses!’”

JFK’s death revisited, by Don Baker - Nov. 15
“The events of those 96 hours are re-created in haunting, minute-by-minute detail in this multimedia project that commemorates the 40th anniversary of JFK’s assassination. His death, along with the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, constitutes a defining moment in recent American history.”

Los Angeles Times

Family Members Visit Kennedy’s Grave Nov. 22 (AP)
“His daughter, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg, his brother, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., and others knelt before the eternal flame that is a memorial to the late president and laid flowers on the stones.”

The Timeless Image of Grief and Sorrow, Commentary by David M. Lubin - Nov. 21
“Some of the 20th century’s best-known, most often reproduced news photographs and footage emerged from a single weekend the one that began Nov. 22, 1963, with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.”

Conspiracy Theories Have Run Their Course, Commentary by Richard M. Mosk - Nov. 11
“Each fall for 40 years we have remembered the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. This year’s decennial anniversary, however, may well be remarkable for what will be missing: myriad articles and discussions debunking the Warren Commission’s conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone.”

“John F. Kennedy’s presidency lasted a thousand days, and he has died a thousand deaths. The CIA killed him. The Mob killed him. Corsican gangsters killed him. Dallas oilmen killed him. Fidel Castro killed him. Cuban exiles killed him. The Diem family killed him. There’s even a new book that says Lyndon Johnson killed him.”

LBJ Aides Call JFK Conspiracy Doc a Smear, by Lynn Elber – (APNov. 19
“A television documentary claiming Lyndon B. Johnson helped plot the Kennedy assassination was condemned as an absurd smear by Johnson’s family and former staff members. A History Channel film that aired Monday alleges that then-Vice President Johnson and members of his staff were responsible for President Kennedy’s 1963 killing, said LBJ Foundation Chairman Tom Johnson, no relation to the former president.”

Then-First Lady of Texas Writes JFK Book, by T.A. Badger – (AP) Nov. 4
“A week or so after President Kennedy was assassinated, Nellie Connally grabbed a legal pad and a couple of pens and found a quiet place in the governor’s mansion to write down what she remembered about the tragic event.”

ABC assassination review pins Oswald, by Mark Washburn - Oct. 31
“Using a computer imaging process roughly akin to video games, ABC News has constructed a forensic tableau that it says proves Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy.”

ABC special out to debunk JFK conspiracy theories, by David Bauder - Oct. 30
“ABC News has conducted an exhaustive investigation of the Kennedy assassination, complete with a computer-generated reconstruction, which irrefutably confirms that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, the network said.”

New York Times

Remembering John F. Kennedy Nov. 22
“Forty years after his death, John F. Kennedy and his cruelly abbreviated presidency continue to resist generalization. It will probably always be thus. His tenure was too short to produce the coherent patterns favored by historians, too consumed by emergencies at home and abroad to leave much time for grand strategies.”

Another Master of the Senate, an Op-Ed by Sean Wilentz - Nov. 21
“Some years after John F. Kennedy’s assassination 40 years ago tomorrow a counter-Camelot myth took hold among historians and journalists. Supposedly, Kennedy was a reckless cold warrior, knee-deep in conspiracies against Fidel Castro. On domestic policy, he was timid and ineffective.”

Fleeting Wisp of Glory, and Eloquence, by Clyde Haberman - Nov. 21
“Maybe his image was created in part with smoke and mirrors. Maybe a complaisant press corps overlooked his moral and physical frailties. Maybe his road to the White House went through cemetery gates in Chicago that Democratic bosses had opened to pump up the vote.”

Freed From Conspiracy, an Op-Ed by Thomas Mallon - Nov. 21
“In considering John F. Kennedy at this 40-year remove, the ultimate “what if” may involve what America might be like had the country been denied the president’s violent death, with its long psychic burden, instead of the rest of his life.”

Dallas Comes to Terms With the Day That Defined It, by Ralph Blumenthal - Nov. 20
“Days after President John F. Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald were gunned down in this city in November 1963, Brig. Gen. Herbert A. Hall, retired in Tucson, folded a large, beribboned certificate into an envelope and mailed it to the mayor of Dallas, Earle Cabell.”

How the Death of a President Led to the Birth of a Medium, by Alessandra Stanley - Nov. 19
“The swirl of interviews, documentaries and specials building up to Nov. 22 are no

um was swept into power and forever changed American culture and politics.”

Revisiting That Historic Day in Dallas, in Many Specials - Nov. 19
“All the 40th-anniversary specials on John F. Kennedy’s assassination include gripping images, some iconically familiar, others, like scenes of a surly Lee Harvey Oswald proclaiming his innocence to reporters after his arrest, more rare. Here are some of the more interesting specials.”

The 40th Anniversary of a 26-Second Reel, by Richard B. Woodward - Nov. 15
“The most valuable piece of film in the world sits in a refrigerated, fireproof safe at a National Archives building in College Park, Md. The work of a complete amateur, who used a Bell & Howell eight-millimeter home movie camera that his secretary had convinced him to bring to work, it is only 26 seconds long.”

40 Years After Shots in Dallas, a Survivor’s Painful Memories, by Ralph Blumenthal - Oct. 31
“In a luxury apartment tower rearing over the city’s toniest shopping district, Nellie Connally pauses, her rush of words sudde

ly stilled. ‘It’s hard to explain,’ she continues after a moment. ‘You can’t believe the horror of being in that car.’”

USA Today

Constitution works when leader falls, an Editorial by Jack Valenti - Nov. 21
“But it also was the day the nation witnessed a miracle. As I later realized with unfathomable awe, everything that had been written down in Philadelphia so long ago by the men who created this nation worked. In today’s turbulent times, there is a lesson here, and a comfort too, in knowing that our democratic system can withstand the most horrific of events.
Company to do computer recreation of Kennedy assassination - Nov. 20
“A New Hampshire 3-D computer animation and multimedia company has put together a computerized recreation of President Kennedy’s assassination for a series shown on Court TV.”

JFK’s assassination still fascinates 40 years later, by Peter Johnson - Nov. 10
“The media love anniversaries, especially ones that end in zero. But the upcoming 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy will be a full-court press. Coverage of this anniversary, observers say, is particularly intense for reasons that eclipse the usual fascination with Kennedy’s death and an endless national obsession with the Kennedy family.”Washington Post

Tragedy Becomes History, by Lee Hockstader - Nov. 22
“On a brilliant November midday, the morbid, the conspiracy-minded and the simply curious still pick their way around Dealey Plaza. They turn a gimlet eye at the grassy knoll and the old School Book Depository building, part with some pocket money for the lurid pamphlets and CDs peddled by a dozen hawkers, and scamper across Elm Street ahead of onrushing traffic, pausing for a split second at the X painted on the fresh asphalt.”

The Day a Generation’s Spirit Died, by Ken Ringle - Nov. 22
“Despite the predictable outpouring of television retrospectives from conspiracy theorists and Camelot nostalgia buffs, it is extremely difficult for those under a certain age to understand everything that died in Dallas 40 years ago, and why we are today in some ways so very much a poorer country.”

Ink and Tears: A Reporter’s Diary, by Richard L. Homan - Nov. 22
“The shock to me was almost physical when I heard about it. The full feeling of grief did not come until today. I can describe it best and most simply by saying that his death affected me as deeply as any death has ever affected me.”

Forensic Files: The Assassination of JFK, by Paul Dowling - Nov. 20
“Court TV’s “Forensic Files” takes a new look at the forensics behind President Kennedy’s assassination investigation on Nov. 19 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, including a controversial piece of evidence that may hold clues to whether there was just one gunmen — or more. “The JFK Assassination: Investigation Reopened” uses modern forensic science to evaluate the Dallas police audio recording that has long been thought to contain the sounds of the gunshots that killed the president.”

Forty Years Later, a Look Back at the Horror of 11/22, Column by Tom Shales - Nov. 17
“At the time, I worked for a small radio station in the Midwest. Five loud bells from the AP teletype machine meant a big story was coming over, a bulletin. The first thing that always happened in such cases is that the machine would break down, or jam, and we’d all have to guess what the catastrophic story might be as it typed out gibberish.”

Jackie Kennedy’s Spiritual Crisis, by Caryle Murphy - Nov. 13
“A few months after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, a grief-stricken Jacqueline Kennedy told a Catholic priest that she had thought about suicide as a way to escape her desolation and rejoin her husband, according to excerpts from the priest’s diary made available yesterday by Georgetown University.”

Washington Times

On an assassin’s trail - Nov. 21
“This is the second of two excerpts from “‘JFK: Breaking the News’ (International Focus Press) by Hugh Aynesworth, Dallas bureau chief of The Washington Times. Mr. Aynesworth, as a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, witnessed the assassination of JFK, the arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald and the killing of Oswald by Jack Ruby.”

LBJ family, former staffers enraged by film of Nov. 22 - (APNov. 20
“A television documentary asserting that Lyndon B. Johnson helped plot the Kennedy assassination was condemned as an absurd smear by Johnson’s family and former staff members.”

Witness to a murder Nov. 20
“This is the first of two excerpts from “JFK: Breaking the News” (International Focus Press) by Hugh Aynesworth, Dallas bureau chief of The Washington Times. Mr. Aynesworth, as a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, witnessed the assassination of JFK, the arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald and the killing of Oswald by Jack Ruby.”

New JFK assassination evidence revealed - (UPINov. 14
“The neurosurgeon on duty at Dallas’s Parkland Memorial Hospital when John F. Kennedy was assassinated is offering his first public account of the event.”College and University Press
Nation marks JFK anniversary, by Corbin H. Crable - Kansas State Collegian – Nov. 21
“People and locations key to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, will recognize the 40th anniversary of the president’s murder this weekend. In Dallas, where Kennedy was killed, the Sixth Floor Museum, housed in the Texas Schoolbook Depository, is expecting an increase in visitors, said Dawn Wyatt, public relations director for the museum. To accommodate the increase, Wyatt said, the museum will have extended hours from Friday until Sunday.”

Kennedy Timeline, by Corbin H. Crable - Kansas State Collegian – Nov. 21
“12:30 p.m.: President Kennedy is shot. Eyewitness Abraham Zapruder captures the entire scene on 8mm film, which government officials will heavily utilize in their research of the assassination. The motorcade immediately heads to Parkland Memorial Hospital.”

Kennedy image varies through generations, by Brian Chalton - Michigan State News – Nov. 21
“Forty years have passed since a fatal shot froze time around the world. Forty years and John F. Kennedy remains the subject of prime-time television specials that lure another generation into obsession with his life and his death. And to many people who never saw the assassinated president alive, Kennedy is a pop-culture icon.”

40 years later, an Opinion - Michigan State News – Nov. 21
“On this, the 40th anniversary of President John. F. Kennedy’s assassination, we pause to remember the life of a man who left behind a legacy. After graduating from Harvard in 1940, Kennedy entered the Navy where he earned the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for leadership and courage.”

BSU recalls JFK’s visit, by Lauren Phillips - Ball State Daily News – Nov. 21
“As Americans reflect on the 40th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, some might remember the day he was shot or his push for civil rights. Louis Ingelhart, Ball State professor emeritus, remembers Kennedy the man, as well as his visit to Ball State before he campaigned for the presidency.”

Forty years later, we must recall JFK’s legacy, Column by Jonathan Menitove - Yale Daily News – Nov. 21
“Forty years ago, on Nov. 22, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. Of course, all of our

parents remember when they heard the news on that late-November day. Some of them even choke up. Our parents recall how President Kennedy embodied optimism, hope and a spirit that the American ideal would prevail, provided that citizens put their country’s interests ahead of their own.”

Community remembers JFK’s death, by Jen WInberry - Penn State Collegian – Nov. 21
“Tomorrow marks the 40th anniversary of the shots that rang out and changed the course of history. On November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on a visit to the city. While the event took place 40 years ago and hundreds of miles away, the Penn State community is still commemorating the day.”

Everyone was there when Kennedy died, by Martin Snapp - Berkely Voice – Nov. 21
“Mayor Tom Bates was a young Army lieutenant stationed in Germany when he heard the news. His future wife, Assemblywoman Loni Hancock, was in New York City. Police Chief Roy Meisner was a freshman at Los Gatos High School, home that day with the flu.”

Students study Kennedy assassination, by Emily Powell - SMU Daily News – Nov. 21
“As the world remembers the infamous John F. Kennedy assassination on its 40th anniversary, students at SMU have the opportunity to delve into the long-running controversy in the Cultural Formations course, Making History.”

Conspiracy theories abound, by Richard Clough - Daily Bruin – Nov. 21
“The JFK assassination is perhaps the most substantial and significant event of the 20th century, and it has elicited much speculation as to whom was ultimately responsible.”

Kennedy Letters to McSorley Released, by Derek Richmond - Georgetown Hoya – Nov. 19
“On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Georgetown University has made public correspondence that took place between Kennedy’s widow and a late Georgetown Jesuit. The letters reveal that Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis contemplated suicide after her husband’s death.”


Other Coverage

Monday, November 24

Doubts persist on JFK assassin, by Michael A. Fuoco - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
“Four days of presentations covering virtually every aspect of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy ended last night at Duquesne University with Dr. Cyril H. Wecht exhorting fellow Warren Commission critics to continue to fight for a re-examination of the case.”

Thousands pay tribute to Kennedy BBC News
“Thousands of people in Dallas, Texas, have marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination there of United States President John F Kennedy. At the Arlington Cemetery near Washington DC, Kennedy family members prayed at the eternal flame which marks the 35th president’s grave.”

Sunday, November 23

Worshipping JFK, Column by William F. Buckley - Town Hall
“I was asked by a television network to comment on the career of President Kennedy. I agreed to do so and do not know how many other views were solicited, or when the program was aired. I have to assume that it went out because the 40th anniversary of the assassination seemed to wipe out all unrelated television fare with the exception of Michael Jackson, who got if not equal time, very nearly that.”

Will the ghosts ever fade? A veteran reporter knows the answer to that question, by John Tackett - San Antonio Express-News
“When people have learned over the years that I was there, the first question they always ask is whether I believe it was a one-man, one-gun crime. I do, and I don’t engage in conspiracy arguments any more. I see no reason to. With a few details left in question, I believe the Warren Commission Report was rock solid in finding Oswald guilty.”

Kennedy’s career was too short, but his impact lives on, an Editorial - Gainesville Times
“Kennedy, the nation’s 35th president, brought to office an elan and style that 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. had never before seen. Forty-three years old when he was elected in 1960, he started his term with optimism and excitement. Anything was possible. Any dream might come true.”

An Anniversary to Remember, by Katie Thomas - Newsday
“Yesterday marked four decades since bullets tore through John F. Kennedy as he rode through Dallas in the back of a convertible. Half a lifetime has passed since his blood spattered Jackie Kennedy’s pink dress and stained the nation’s collective memory.”

Visitors Pause at the Eternal Flame, by Robert Gutsche, Jr. - Newsday
“At one point yesterday morning, about 60 people crowded the steps overlooking Washington and bent over a chain fence to look upon the hissing orange flame. It altered shape and direction with the wind, slowly moving from the east to the north.”

Lamm: JFK’s death a ‘loss of innocence,’ Column by Dianne Carman - Denver Post
“On the day that John F. Kennedy died, my mother, who had voted for Richard Nixon, wept. Schools across the U.S. canceled classes. Businesses closed. Television programming was interrupted for days as nonstop news coverage consumed a nation.”

Dallas remembers the day JFK died, by Jon Herskovitz - Toronto Star
“Conspiracy theorists flocked to the infamous grassy knoll yesterday and parents pointed toward a sixth-floor window as thousands gathered in Dealey Plaza to mark the day, 40 years ago, when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on a trip through Dallas.”

Perhaps we remember it too much, Column by Ed Quillen - Denver Post
“When I started pondering the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, I knew that most Americans my age – if not all – remember exactly where they were and what they were doing when the news arrived.”

‘We’ll never be young again,’ Column by Fred Brown - Denver Post
“Three of every five Americans weren’t yet born when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated 40 years ago. Eliminate those who were toddlers or younger, and something less than a third of us can remember where we were on that unforgettable November day.”

Saturday, November 22

Forty years later, the JFK cult has faded, by Christopher Hitchens - Wall Street Journal (Opinion Journal)
“A short while ago, I chanced to be in Dallas making a documentary film. One of the shots involved a camera angle from a big commercial tower overlooking Dealey Plaza and the former “book depository,” and it was later necessary for us to take the road through the celebrated underpass. The crew I worked with was younger than I am (you may as well make that much younger) and consisted of a Chinese-Australian, an English girl brought up in Africa, a Jewish guy from Brooklyn and other elements of a cross-section.”

Novak: Kennedy’s death ‘something I’ll never forget’ CNN
“On the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, CNN contributor and syndicated columnist Robert Novak was a 32-year-old journalist working in Washington with fellow columnist, the late Roland “Rowly” Evans. Novak recently visited Kennedy’s grave and the eternal flame memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. He shared his memories of November 22, 1963.”

Wallace: ‘This place is stirring strong emotions’ CNN
“CNN national correspondent Kelly Wallace joined the thousands gathered in Dallas for Saturday’s anniversary and spoke with CNN anchor Catherine Callaway about how people were remembering the president.”

JFK case still not closed, by Joe Havely - CNN
“Like the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the terrorist strikes of September 11, 2001, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was a defining moment in American and world history.”

Thousands pay tribute to Kennedy BBC News
“Thousands of people in Dallas, Texas, have marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination there of United States President John F Kennedy. At the Arlington Cemetery near Washington DC, Kennedy family members prayed at the eternal flame which marks the 35th president’s grave.”

JFK: The simple truth, by Gavin Esler - BBC News
“The assassination of the 35th President of the United States 40 years ago in Dallas, Texas, came at a particularly tense point in the Cold War. Kennedy’s successor Lyndon Johnson immediately realised that if – as many suspected – the Cubans or the Russians had conspired to kill Kennedy then the result would be a nuclear war.”

In his life, we loved him more — and in death, the Beatle-like myth of JFK shows his dream isn’t over, by James Sullivan - San Francisco Chronicle
“In his new book “Magic Circles: The Beatles in Dream and History,” author Devin McKinney considers the transformation that gripped the famous foursome as they evolved from teen phenomenon into something utterly different, something at once cagey and experimental.”

40 years: An important marker for a critical event , by Tyrone Beason - Seattle Times
“People remember exactly where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news that President John F. Kennedy was dead. Educators, politicians and even young people who came of age long after the 1960s say JFK’s assassination may be as meaningful now as on that tragic Dallas afternoon 40 years ago today.”

Assassin’s bullet still causes pain, by Mike Lewis - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“The gym teacher looked like a Marine with a whistle. Always addressed as Mr. Maxwell, he was thick, wore a crew cut, lacked a neck and barked such phrases as, ‘hop to it.’ When angry, he would swat his offender with a sneaker the size of small canoe. Or so it seemed.”

America Remembers JFK Al Jazeera
“Americans are marking the 40th anniversary of the assassination of one of their most beloved presidents, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, whose death remains shrouded in mystery to this day.”

JFK remembered ABC News
“The United States has solemnly remembered president John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas, Texas 40 years ago.”

Thousands Remember Kennedy in Dallas - ABC News (AP)
“Thousands of mourners, conspiracy theorists and the just plain curious gathered Saturday along the downtown street where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated 40 years earlier, with many of them recalling where they had been at the very moment they heard the news.”

JFK galvanized a nation Denver Post
“For a generation of Americans, the shots that rang out 40 years ago in Dallas still echo in their souls, and the tears from that sorrowful day have never quite dried.”

Are memories of JFK fading? by Mike Kilen - Des Moines Register
“Most young Americans place him in a mental archive of dusty presidential images and voices. The Abe Lincoln portrait. The crackling recording of Franklin Roosevelt’s “nothing to fear” address. The black-and-white videotape of Kennedy saying, ‘Ich bin ein Berliner.’”

Camelot…Not, Column by Neil Cavuto - Town Hall
“It was one of those small things that usually go unnoticed in TV news coverage. A news network (not my own) teased two upcoming stories. I’m not quoting it exactly, but it went something like, ‘a look back on JFK then a look forward to Michael Jackson.’ Two compelling issues joined at the electronic hip. I half expected the next tease to read, ‘from the King of Pop to the guy who got popped. Next!’”

Forty years ago, Column by Jay Bryant - Town Hall
“As has been truly said repeatedly, every American then alive remembers the moment he or she heard about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy forty years ago. Younger folks can compare it to the similar remembrance they will always have of where they were when they heard about the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.”

Photographer remembers ‘John-John’ salute, by Tobin Beck - UPI
“UPI photographer Stan Stearns took the picture outside St. Matthew’s Cathedral, after the Kennedy family emerged from the church following the funeral of President John F. Kennedy on Monday, Nov. 25, 1963. He was assassinated 

Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas.”

SMC professor shares JFK knowledge, by Barbara Dempsey - South Bend Tribune
“And this weekend, as he boils his years of researching evidence on the head wounds of the late President John F. Kennedy into a 40-minute presentation in Pittsburgh at a national symposium on the assassination of Nov. 22, 1963, he faces a weighty challenge of his own. And that is trying to convince some of the most noted researchers in the world on the subject that he has, in fact, uncovered a limited conspiracy involving leading forensic pathologists and an illustrator who worked on the case”

Kennedy remembered as civil rights ally, by May Lee Johnson - South Bend Tribune
“A longtime local civil rights pioneer who worked on the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 says the legacy of President John F. Kennedy is bringing the civil rights movement to the forefront of the nation’s consciousness.”

Buffalo’s affection for Kennedy endures, by Robert J. McCarthy - Buffalo News
“As the nation pauses to mark the anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination, so does a city with strong political and cultural bonds to the Massachusetts senator who later became the nation’s 35th president. And while many of the key Buffalo figures who helped John Kennedy along his road to the White House are now gone, there remains a strong local identification with a man who influenced an entire generation, and who still commands powerful emotions among those he left behind. “

The JFK mystique, by Charles Madigan - Buffalo News
“The dominant thought in the late 1950s was that nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union was a distinct possibility. Moscow had taken the advantage in space with Sputnik, which panicked the Western world. Nikita Khrushchev, Stalin’s successor, was in no way benign. The Kremlin had the weapons and the rockets to deliver them.”

Lakeland Radio Reporter Got Close to Assassin, by Gary White - Ledger
“The assassination of President John F. Kennedy spawned something that has become common in the subsequent 40 years: a media frenzy. Along with such TV correspondents as Dan Rather and Robert McNeil, those covering the aftermath of the shooting in Dallas included a 21-year-old reporter from a Lakeland radio station.”

Former Students Recall Dark Day, by Suzie Schottelkotte - Ledger
“In November 1963, those in Summerlin Institute’s senior class in Bartow felt confident about their future. The country seemed to be moving in the right direction, led by a young president with whom they felt a connection.”

Local Leaders Recall Meeting John Kennedy, by Bill Rufty - Ledger
“State Sen. Scott Kelly, a candidate for governor, had just finished a luncheon speech to the Jacksonville Civitan Club on Nov. 22, 1963, when he was told that President John F. Kennedy had been shot in Dallas”

The JFK Legacy Salt Lake Tribune
“Utahns alive 40 years ago today might have learned of John F. Kennedy’s fate from the bells of the Cathedral of the Madeleine in Salt Lake City, which tolled for 15 minutes without stopping upon official word of the president’s death.”

Kennedy in Utah: Charming a solidly Republican Utah, by Dawn House - Salt Lake Tribune
“It was Richard Nixon — not John F. Kennedy — who captured the hearts of Utahns in the 1960 presidential race, including that of beloved Mormon Church President David O. McKay.”

JFK’s commitment to service Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette
“The eloquent lines from his inauguration remain among those most remembered from his thousand days in office: “And so my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” Public service can hold many meanings, but Kennedy’s message was specific. He wanted a government workforce that attracted the nation’s most talented and idealistic people.”

Still today, a sense of loss Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette
“The nation would continue to grieve the loss of its president during the next several months, but none of the memories of those days of mourning sting like those of the first moments when the news arrived 40 years ago today.”

JFK’s unspoken words, an Editorial - St. Petersburg Times
“We in this country, in this generation, are – by destiny rather than choice – the watchman on the walls of world 

freedom. We ask, therefore, that we may be worthy of our power and responsibility, that we may exercise our strength with wisdom and restraint, and that we may achieve in our time the ancient vision of peace on earth, goodwill toward men.”

JFK, portraits from memory, by Tom Zucco - St. Petersburg Times
“People in their 50s and older don’t need much more prompting. It’s the faceless brick building in downtown Dallas, the place where Lee Harvey Oswald used a $21.45 mail order rifle to fire three shots from a sixth-floor window and assassinate President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago today.”

JFK, 40 years later Rocky Mountain News
“To many, this charming, witty, youthful leader – the first president born in the 20th century – seemed a symbol of a new vitality in a land that had experienced relative quiet in the decade prior to his election. He seemed filled with promise, but that promise was cut short, and it was as if history had been robbed.”

A day that changed people’s lives Sarasota Herald Tribune
“Over the weekend, America paused to reflect upon events that occurred 50 years ago. For the majority of our population, Pearl Harbor is but an event that they read about in a history book. For those who actually remember Dec. 7, 1941, the inevitable question is: ‘Where were you when you heard the news about the sneak attack by the Japanese?’”

Death of a president JFK’s assassination was an attack on all Americans Sarasota Herald Tribune
“Most remembrances have focused on Kennedy the man, and for understandable reasons. Camelot, starring JFK, was good theater. Kennedy was the charismatic, enigmatic, idealistic leader of a new generation of Americans. He was the first telegenic president and the last president to be assassinated.”

Conspiracy tales profitable fiction Sarasota Herald Tribune
“I was deeply disturbed as I watched the shows this week that marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. According to current polls, a majority of Americans now believe that his murder was the result of a conspiracy.”

Sen. Inouye recalls eerie calm after JFK’s death, by Mary Adamski - Honolulu Star-Bulletin
“Like any American over the age of 50, Hawaii’s senior senator has a vivid memory of the moment on Nov. 22, 1963, when he learned that President John F. Kennedy was shot.”

Friday, November 21

JFK: We still wonder what might have been, Column by William C. Kashatus - Seattle Times
“After 40 years, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy continues to ignite countless conspiracy theories, rising from the strange circumstances and seemingly inexplicable actions surrounding it.”

A new generation feels little link to JFK, by Beth Gillen - Philadelphia Inquirer
“For more than half of the U.S. population, not yet born on Nov. 22, 1963, Kennedy’s death is an event unclouded by sentiment. It is a truism that baby boomers and their parents can instantly summon what they were doing and how they felt when they got the news from Dallas.”

Classroom sleuths examine JFK’s death, by Terry Bitman - Philadelphia Inquirer
“Erica Regosch believes she knows who killed President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago tomorrow. It was the Mafia. ‘That’s my personal opinion,’ the Williamstown High School senior said yesterday as she presented her and two classmates’ research to their advanced placement government and politics class.”

Kennedy: The enduring allure BBC News
“When the BBC asked me to help make a documentary for the 40th anniversary of President John F Kennedy’s death I was tempted to suggest repeating a Newsnight special I had written for the 20th anniversary in 1983.”

John F. Kennedy, an Editorial - Nation
“A young President, John F. Kennedy must have known or sensed that he did not have all time and eternity to accomplish his major objectives. He was in a hurry to reach the top and he was not long in reaching it. Once there he wanted to get things done, to spin the wheels faster, to move along.”

JFK conspiracy theory 101: A lesson in ambiguity CNN (Reuters)
“The shots rang out in Dallas 40 years ago, and the students’ research papers on assassination conspiracy theories were due on the desk of Southern Methodist University professor Tom Stone earlier this week. Stone has been teaching a course for 10 years on the John F. Kennedy presidential assassination at SMU, a university in Dallas located a few miles north of where Kennedy was gunned down on November 22, 1963.”

Review: All right, who really killed JFK? by L.D. Meagher - CNN
“Forty years later, and there are still questions about the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The intervening decades have seen the rise of an entire industry dedicated to providing answers — lots of answers, many conflicting.  Indeed, one could select virtually any two books on the assassination at random and find in them a wealth of contradictions. So where to look for The Truth?”

Dallas Through the Looking Glass, by David Greenberg - Slate
“In November 1973, on the 10th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas, the New Left muckraking magazine Ramparts ran a long essay titled ‘From Dallas to Watergate: The Longest Cover-Up.’ The author, Peter Dale Scott, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, put forth the idea that Kennedy’s murder and the scandals then engulfing the Nixon administration were linked.”

Remembering Air Force One In A Gray Sky, Column by Steve Otto - Tampa Tribune
“If you are of a certain age, you remember exactly where you were and what you were doing in that moment 40 years ago Saturday. The assassination of John F. Kennedy was one of those markers in our lives. For some, it was a watershed moment that drew a psychological line between the end of the 1950s and the true beginning of the 1960s.”

Is Kennedy assassination losing its resonance? by Mary McKee - Akron Beacon Journal
“John Lohnstein’s eyes were glazed with tears as he stood near the spot where President John F. Kennedy was fatally shot. Traffic roared by and a gusty wind whipped around him. But Lohnstein, 69,was undeterred by the distractions, deep in a reverie of painful memories.”

Kennedy Kitsch, by James T. Madore - Newsday
“In a frozen tableau from minutes before an assassin struck, President John F. Kennedy is looking to his right and smiling. Beside him first lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy sits serenely in a pink suit with matching pill-box hat. In front of them are Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife, Nellie, along with a driver who is gripping the steering wheel with both hands.”

In JFK’s death, modern TV news was born, by Tim Cuprison - Arizona Republic
“When Dan Rather took the CBS anchor chair on the terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, after the second World Trade Center tower had been hit, he flashed back 38 years.”

Teachers ponder relevance of Kennedy to today’s students, by Larry Slonaker - San Jose Mercury News
“Some baby boomers remember the John F. Kennedy assassination in 1963 as if it were yesterday. What they sometimes forget is that to many members of subsequent generations, what happened 40 years ago is just another faded black-and-white snapshot from the past.”

Kennedy family say JFK’s heritage applies today, by Dennis Redomont - San Francisco Chronicle (AP)
“Italy honored members of the Kennedy clan Thursday ahead of the 40th anniversary of JFK’s death in a visit that recalled the president’s ‘prophetic and far-reaching vision’ on terrorism, nuclear conflict and a united Europe.”

The Pink Suit, by Delia M. Rios - Ledger
“Not long after that terrible day in Dallas — no one knows exactly when — a brown paper box arrived at the National Archives. The return address was on O Street, the Georgetown home of Jacqueline Kennedy’s mother. Packed inside was the pink Chanel suit first glimpsed Nov. 22, 1963, when the first lady joined JFK at a Fort Worth breakfast, and which, covered in his blood, she still wore the next morning to escort the slain president’s casket into the White House.”

Thursday, November 20

Kennedy, Column by George Will - Town Hall 

“Landing in New York on a speaking trip, the president impulsively decided not to have a motorcade into Manhattan, so his limousine stopped at 10 traffic lights. At one, a woman ran to the car and snapped a photograph inches from his face. A policeman exclaimed, ‘Oh, my God. She could have been an assassin.’ It was Nov. 15, 1963.”

Acts of evil test every generation, Column by Nicole Brodeur - Seattle Times
“Pressed, she couldn’t remember where her 2-year-old was that day. Somewhere in the house, she said. Around. I don’t mind that my mom couldn’t tell me exactly where I was on Nov. 22, 1963  the day John F. Kennedy was shot.”

day television came of age, by Vinay Menon - Toronto Star
“In many ways, the death of John F. Kennedy gave birth to television. Sure, the medium was around long before Nov. 22, 1963. But on that surreal day, as shots rang out in Dallas and confusion engulfed a nation, television was forced to awkwardly mature.”

40 years haven’t dulled memories of JFK, by Marianne Means - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“It’s not as though we would ever forget, nor fail to pass our memories on to our children. But television is typically overdoing it, indulging in dramatic excess.All week there are panels, miniseries, interviews and documentaries reliving the Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of President Kennedy.”

Ex-agent refuses to toe party line on JFK slaying, by Ellen Miller - Rocky Mountain News
“Lee Harvey Oswald didn’t act alone when he killed President John F. Kennedy, a retired agent said Wednesday, and the president died because Secret Service agents failed at their jobs.”

Did Jackie O.’s Priest Betray Her? by Michael McGough - Slate
“In The Kennedys: America’s Emerald Kings, released last month, journalist Thomas Maier reports that the recently widowed Jacqueline Kennedy told the Rev. Richard McSorley she had contemplated suicide. Maier’s book draws on interviews with the late McSorley, excerpts from his diary, and letters from her. Did McSorley violate the storied seal of the confessional by allowing the content of his conversations with Jackie Kennedy to become public?”

Carrying JFK then and now, by David Giffels - Akron Beacon Journal
“So he understood why, 40 years after the fact, I might be interested in his small piece of an American epic. Why I might be interested in a man from Stow who was a pallbearer at one of the most famous funerals in our nation’s history.”

Wednesday, November 19

In The Northwest: We lost JFK, and then we lost a whole lot more, by Joel Connelly - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“While summoning true believers to protest CBS’ TV movie about Ronald and Nancy Reagan, our nation’s conservative talking heads did not for an instant cease their simultaneous, decades-old trashing of the Kennedy family.”

JFK’s Diary Unlocked for Koreans, by Han Eun-Jung - Korea Times
“‘Prelude to Leadership: The European Diary of John F. Kennedy Summer 1945′ unravels the thoughts of a 28-year-old John F. Kennedy. This collection of private entries from a diary kept by the late president sheds light on a side of Kennedy that has never been seen before.”

JFK’s birth, not his death, is important, Column by Rochelle Riley - Detroit Free Press
“President John F. Kennedy was never as large in life as he has become after death. His legacy would never have been so celebrated. For even if he had succeeded at all he set out to do, his accomplishments would have been no match for the emotion evoked by the assassination of a man trying to change the world.”

Making a case for JFK specials, by David Bianculli - New York Daily News
“Conspiracy theorists, consider this: Various cable and broadcast TV networks are presenting specials this week about the John F. Kennedy assassination, and reaching similar conclusions.”

Tuesday, November 18

JFK, plus 40, Column by Cal Thomas - Town Hall
“On election night, 1960, I watched the returns trickle in to Huntley and Brinkley on a black-and-white TV set at an 

t really about the 40th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination. They commemorate the 40th anniversary of television: the day a young, vigorous medi

American University fraternity house in Washington. I was an almost 18-year-old college freshman, and Dwight Eisenhower was the only president I had been aware of.”

Your memories of JFK BBC
“There was shock and disbelief in the United States and around the world. Some compare the impact of Kennedy’s assassination to that of the attacks on the US in September 2001. People alive then remember vividly the moment they heard he had been shot, just as people recall where they were when they first found out about the attacks on Washington and New York.”

‘Our president,’ by Colette Bancroft St. Petersburg Times
“On a bright, beautiful fall day, he landed at MacDill Air Force Base at midday. He lunched at its Officers Club, spoke at Al Lopez Field, the International Inn and Fort Homer Hesterly Armory, and rode in a motorcade through downtown Tampa. He returned to the base to fly on to Miami before dark.”

Coverage of assassination shaped TV’s Sept. 11 role, by Jim Cuprisen - Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
“When Dan Rather first took the CBS anchor chair on the terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, after the second World Trade Center tower had been hit, he flashed back 38 years.”

Monday, November 17

Destiny takes a young president to Dallas, by Nellie Connally and Mickie Herskowitz - Albany Times-Union
“I left Austin for San Antonio at noon on Thursday, November 21. John was in Houston and would arrive shortly after me. It had been almost two years since I had seen the Kennedys, and although John and Jack had been in touch for various reasons, a lot had changed in the meantime. I was looking forward to renewing our friendship.”

The day JFK died, by R.D. Heldfelds - Akron Beacon Journal
“Census figures indicate that about half the current U.S. population wasn’t even born when John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Sunday, November 16

Remembering Kennedy’s life, death, by Mark Dawidziak - Cleveland Plain-Dealer
“It was one of those moments that seemed painfully etched in every American’s consciousness. Yes, you knew where you were and what you were doing at the second you learned about Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

JFK Had Style, Substance, by Les Payne - Newsday
“He was the first candidate I’d seen up close, John F. Kennedy. Wandering out of G. Fox Department store, I got washed up in the current of a political rally stirred by the Kennedy advance men. Just as suddenly, this black sedan dispensed a shock of brown hair who stood erect in blue serge and rasped almost poetically in what seemed like a mockery of a Boston accent.”

Saturday, November 15

Who Killed JFK? After 40 Years, Doubts Remain, by James Toedtman - New York Newsday
“The assassination of President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago jarred the country. A normally stoic Walter Cronkite paused to compose himself as he delivered the news. Men and women wept openly on the streets upon hearing. Then there was Jacqueline Kennedy’s tear-streaked face and blood-stained suit.”

American University fraternity house in Washington. I was an almost 18-year-old college freshman, and Dwight Eisenhower was the only president I had been aware of.”

Your memories of JFK BBC
“There was shock and disbelief in the United States and around the world. Some compare the impact of Kennedy’s assassination to that of the attacks on the US in September 2001. People alive then remember vividly the moment they heard he had been shot, just as people recall where they were when they first found out about the attacks on Washington and New York.”

‘Our president,’ by Colette Bancroft St. Petersburg Times
“On a bright, beautiful fall day, he landed at MacDill Air Force Base at midday. He lunched at its Officers Club, spoke at Al Lopez Field, the International Inn and Fort Homer Hesterly Armory, and rode in a motorcade through downtown Tampa. He returned to the base to fly on to Miami before dark.”

Coverage of assassination shaped TV’s Sept. 11 role, by Jim Cuprisen - Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
“When Dan Rather first took the CBS anchor chair on the terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, after the second World Trade Center tower had been hit, he flashed back 38 years.”

Monday, November 17

Destiny takes a young president to Dallas, by Nellie Connally and Mickie Herskowitz - Albany Times-Union
“I left Austin for San Antonio at noon on Thursday, November 21. John was in Houston and would arrive shortly after me. It had been almost two years since I had seen the Kennedys, and although John and Jack had been in touch for various reasons, a lot had changed in the meantime. I was looking forward to renewing our friendship.”

The day JFK died, by R.D. Heldfelds - Akron Beacon Journal
“Census figures indicate that about half the current U.S. population wasn’t even born when John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Sunday, November 16

Remembering Kennedy’s life, death, by Mark Dawidziak - Cleveland Plain-Dealer
“It was one of those moments that seemed painfully etched in every American’s consciousness. Yes, you knew where you were and what you were doing at the second you learned about Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

JFK Had Style, Substance, by Les Payne - Newsday
“He was the first candidate I’d seen up close, John F. Kennedy. Wandering out of G. Fox Department store, I got washed up in the current of a political rally stirred by the Kennedy advance men. Just as suddenly, this black sedan dispensed a shock of brown hair who stood erect in blue serge and rasped almost poetically in what seemed like a mockery of a Boston accent.”

Saturday, November 15

Who Killed JFK? After 40 Years, Doubts Remain, by James Toedtman - New York Newsday
“The assassination of President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago jarred the country. A normally stoic Walter Cronkite paused to compose himself as he delivered the news. Men and women wept openly on the streets upon hearing. Then there was Jacqueline Kennedy’s tear-streaked face and blood-stained suit.”

40 years on, Arlen Specter and Cyril Wecht still don’t agree how JFK died, by Michael A. Fuoco - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
“Neither Wecht, then 32, nor Specter, then 33, could have known then they would soon become inextricably linked with that momentous event and the endless debate about what really happened during those ‘six seconds in Dallas’ on Nov. 22, 1963.”

History pays thoughtful tribute with `JFK,’ by Monica Collins - Boston Herald
“The Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of President John F. Kennedy was the first cataclysm carried live on TV. I vividly remember that on that bleak weekend 40 years ago,our family’s small black-and-white TV was always on. We clustered around to view what I comprehended to be the worst thing to happen so far in my young life.”

Friday, November 14

Nov. 22, 1963: Forty years later, TV’s fascination with JFK lives on, by Kay McFadden - Seattle Times
“Abraham Zapruder’s home-movie recording of Nov. 22, 1963, appears in dozens of specials centered on the anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Such are the requirements of a famous life arrested by greater infamy.”

Networks seize JFK’s anniversary with zeal, by Melanie McFarland - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“Those of us who weren’t even born on the day he died know the images well: a tiny John Jr. saluting his father’s casket, Walter Cronkite holding back tears while relaying the news of Kennedy’s death, suspect Lee Harvey Oswald being gunned down two days later by Jack Ruby in front of news cameras.”

Thursday, November 13

2 weeks of JFK specials mark 40th anniversary, by Don Kaplan - New York Post
“TV will commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of John F. Kennedy with more than 10 hours of special Kennedy-themed programming, starting tonight.”

Who killed JFK? by Stephen Battaglio - New York Daily News
“To mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, ABC, Court TV and Fox News Channel will air new investigations into whether Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone.”

UPI’s Pulitzer-winning coverage of JFK, by Tobin Beck - UPI
“Nov. 22 was a busy but routine Friday in the Dallas UPI bureau 40 years ago until a yell across the newsroom signaled one of history’s defining moments — the assassination of John F. Kennedy.”

Wednesday, November 12

What JFK conspiracy?: Dean College professor decries theory, by Emelie Rutherford - Milford Daily News
“Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone when he shot President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago on Nov. 22, 1963, and there was no conspiracy, Dean College Professor Harry L. Kreshpane has been telling local audiences for decades.”


Tuesday, November 11

Remembering John F. Kennedy, by Christopher Dreher - Publishers Weekly
“For decades, the Kennedys have been the most documented family in America, inspiring a spectrum of books, from histories to biographies to photo compilations, that play up the elements of mystery, scandal, romance and conspiracy that surround them. Leading up to the 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, numerous network and cable TV specials and commemorative events are likely to spur interest in the tribute books arriving this fall. But despite lasting public fascination with the family, booksellers say that overall demand for Kennedy books is decreasing gradually.”

A nation’s loss, by Matt Towery - Town Hall
“This month marks the 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963. Surveys consistently show that event profoundly affected the outlook of an entire generation of Americans, much as 9/11 has the current one.”

The Kennedy Assassination – 40 Years Later Newswise
“40 years ago, on November 22nd, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while visiting Dallas, Texas. For those who lived through that event, it was a time of sadness and great fear of the unknown. 40 years later, the passage of time has allowed many to take a thorough look at the Kennedy presidency and its legacy.”

The Bear’s Lair: Was JFK a supply-sider? by Martin Hutchinson - UPI
“The 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination later this month is bringing the inevitable slew of retrospectives, either polishing the halo or belittling the achievements, according to taste. However, in the economic area, Kennedy’s greatest achievement was an anomalous one: he was the true father of the supply-side economic revolution.”

Monday, November 10

Framing John F. Kennedy in the History Books - Newswise
“Regardless of whether or not they were alive at the time of his presidency, most people ‘know’ or ‘remember’ John F. Kennedy through visual images, says Temple magazine professor Carolyn Kitch. ‘These iconic pictures appeared primarily in magazines during Kennedys time in office and his assassination, and, more importantly, have reappeared repeatedly in mass media over the past 40 years, especially when Jackie died in 1994 and when JFK Jr. died in 1999,’ notes Kitch, an expert in social memory and author of the journal article, ‘A Death in the American Family’”

Images of Kennedy years compared to classics, by Jane Stancill - News & Observer
“Wake Forest University art professor David Lubin has a new book that explores famous photographs and film images of President John F. Kennedy and his family. The book, “Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images,” was published this month by the University of California Press — just in time to mark the passage of 40 years since the assassination that shook the country. Lubin draws from Hollywood films, TV sitcoms, modern art, neoclassical painting and designer fashion in his book, which shows how the public came to romanticize the Kennedy family.”

 Friday, November 7

Court TV’s The JFK Assassination: Investigation Reopened, Examines Alleged Audio Evidence of Second Shooter Business Wire
“It was a crime that shocked the world – and sparked an investigation that is still going on today. Even after 40 years, the assassination of John F. Kennedy remains one of the 20th century’s most enduring and controversial mysteries. Was there a conspiracy? A cover-up? Was Lee Harvey Oswald the only gunman?”

Thursday, October 30

Andy Warhol Museum Commemorates 40th Anniversary of JFK Assassination with Exhibition ‘November 22, 1963: Image, Memory Myth’ Yahoo Finance
“To coincide with the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, The Andy Warhol Museum presents ‘November 22, 1963: Image, Memory, Myth,’ a thought-provoking exhibition that presents the events of that defining moment in history from a number of perspectives, including the approach of Pittsburgh-native Andy Warhol.”

Tuesday, October 14

Dallas plans series of events to mark 40th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, by Mary McKee - Centre Daily
“As the nation prepares to mark the 40th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination, officials in Dallas began their observance on Tuesday by unveiling an exhibit about the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.”

 

 

Boston Globe

40 years after those 6.9 seconds in Dallas,by Mark Feeney - Nov. 22
“Forty years ago today, John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Anyone much over 45 remembers hearing the news and the absolute shock of it. How to describe to anyone much under 45 what that experience was like? The obvious comparison is with Sept. 11, 2001 — except for this difference. Before 9/11, there had been the Kennedy assassination. Before the Kennedy assassination, there had been nothing.”

Margaret H. Marshall - Op-Ed - Nov. 22
“The telephone rang in my Johannesburg home. “Have you heard?” The news struck as a thunderbolt rolling across the South African skies. Word of mouth. In 1963, South Africa had no television, and the apartheid government controlled the official state radio. Details of the assassination were hard to come by — President John F. Kennedy was no friend of the apartheid government. But to the antiapartheid forces in South Africa he was a hero, a powerful symbol to us that America’s commitment to liberty and justice for all was no longer an empty slogan. And for me, his death felt personal.”

Shedding light on movies about a dark day in Dallas, by Glenn Lovell - Nov. 21
“It’s something to consider as we prepare to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the shooting — once recalled as The Day Camelot Died — and we look back on Hollywood dramatizations, past and present, intended and coincidental.”

JFK’s November, an Op/Ed by James Carroll - Nov. 18
“The chill wind from the north has come. The days fall into darkness with premature finality. Now begins the season that first made human beings afraid of the year. The rotations and revolutions of the Earth define the very limits of existence, the controls of light and warmth, yet no direct perception of these movements is possible. Indeed, your daily perception — that the sun is the thing that moves from dawn to dusk — is unreliable, or so science tells you. And now the seasonal evidence is equally perplexing. In the northern climes, this is the time of what seems the sun’s retreat. Yet it is only the arc of Earth’s rotation? Never mind. As the sharp green leaves once turned to follow the sun’s course in the sky (the leaves believe it moves), so the winter soul adjusts itself for dark.”

A history lesson with Kennedy at its core, by Sam Allis - Nov. 17
“And there is nothing breathtaking in ‘JFK: A Presidency Revealed’ for the close, or even casual, reader of history. It is an able, well-written effort best suited to younger generations who have barely heard of the man. Even the astonishing litany of the man’s medical maladies and the drugs he took for them is already in the public domain, thanks to historian Robert Dallek. (Kennedy was given last rites three times during the 1950s.) Kennedy’s womanizing is old news.”

Capturing Kennedy, by Thom Powers - Nov. 17
“Americans can’t get enough of going behind the scenes — whether it’s into the fictionalized Washington of HBO’s ‘K Street,’ the rock`n’roll household of ‘The Osbournes,’ or the huddles of NBA basketball teams. But 40 years ago, such intimate access — and the technology that enabled it — were brand-new. When a young Life magazine reporter named Robert Drew told John F. Kennedy that he wanted to film the junior senator’s every move during a week of his presidential campaign, the proposal was unprecedented. By consenting to Drew’s pitch, the media-savvy candidate fostered the creation of two remarkabe documentaries.”

Programs look back on that fateful day, by Suzanne C. Ryan - Nov. 16
“Tonight marks the start of an extended TV observance of the 40th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination. Will we learn anything new? Perhaps only that, to this day, no one knows exactly what happened, but everyone’s aware that it was momentous.”

JFK holiday necessary? by Adrian Walker - Nov. 10
“So now comes a proposal to honor the memory of John F. Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States and the last one from Massachusetts. Politically, it’s probably the most palatable holiday one could propose. Even questioning it seems nearly churlish.”

ABC probes JFK assassination, by David Bauder - Oct. 28
“ABC News said yesterday it has conducted an exhaustive investigation of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, complete with a computer-generated reconstruction that irrefutably confirms Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone. A two-hour special on the event is scheduled to air Nov. 20, two days before the 40th anniversary of the killing.”

Baltimore Sun
40 years ago, NFL chose to play after JFK 
Nov. 23 (AP)
“Forty years after President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, NFL owners remember how two pro football leagues reacted differently to the horror of events in Dallas that day. In 1963, there was a spirited battle going on between the established NFL, led by commissioner Pete Rozelle, and the upstart AFL, with medal of honor winner Joe Foss in charge.”

Oswald sought notice, brother says Nov. 23 (AP)
“The shooting of President John F. Kennedy was not a political conspiracy but an almost spontaneous act by a troubled man who wanted attention, the brother of Lee Harvey Oswald says.”

Turn of the tide, by Gerald P. Merrell -  Nov. 22
“To many, though, today’s 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John Fitzgerald Kennedy is not about the images that flickered across television screens, or even about one man; it’s a reminder of a period, both exhilarating and dreadful, that began with so much seeming possible, and ended with unimaginable violence.”

A history of independence, by Marego Athans - Nov. 22
“The darts started flying 40 years ago, when the young assistant district attorney serving on the Warren Commission came up with the “single-bullet theory,” leading to the conclusion that a lone gunman assassinated President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Assassination brought a tragic Thanksgiving, by Frederick N. Rasmussen - Nov. 22
“In the numbing, almost unbearable, grief that gripped the nation in the days following the assassination of John F. Kennedy, Americans faced Thanksgiving week with heavy hearts.”

Reasons to run JFK complex and varied, by Candus Thomson - Nov. 21
“Kennedy was the spark for the first race, in April 1963. He challenged the Marines to finish a 50-mile hike in 14 hours, a test established in 1908 by President Theodore Roosevelt.”

Time for the truth, Op-Ed by Jerry McKnight - Nov. 21
“The report and its 26 volumes of hearings and exhibits, with 17,000 pages of testimony and more than 10 million words, initially were celebrated as the most comprehensive investigation in history. The commission concluded that Lee Harvey Oswald alone assassinated JFK – there was no domestic or foreign conspiracy behind the tragedy in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

In Trauma Room 1 with JFK, by Frank D. Roylance - Nov. 21
“After 40 years it has become a tired truism that anyone old enough to remember the assassination of President John F. Kennedy can remember clearly where they were and what they were doing when they first heard the news from Dallas.”

An examination of Kennedy’s life, by David Zurawik - Nov. 15
“Given television’s fondness for sex and violence, it’s no surprise that in the coming weeks, dozens of programs mark the 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s death by emphasizing two things: his assignations with women and his assassination in Dallas.”

Chicago Sun-Times

Today’s youngsters ask: Why was JFK shot? by Kris Axtman - Nov. 22
“Seventh-graders Samantha Block and Julia Ferguson have spent the last few weeks watching videos on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. They’ve written poems on their feelings about the day that shook their hometown — and the nation — 40 years ago; they’ve even interviewed people who were alive when Kennedy was killed. And now, after touring the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, they say they kind of get it.”

When an 8-year-old watched his first murder, Column by Mark Brown - Nov. 18
“This month’s copy of the Irish American News landed in my box at work last week with an attention-grabbing cover photo: a black-and-white of John F. Kennedy standing in the back seat of a limousine amidst a crowd of people.”

Kennedy honors slain brothers Nov. 17
“Sen. Edward M. Kennedy remembered his slain brothers Sunday, saying he felt loss, but also inspiration, when thinking of them.”

The rifle that killed JFK, by Andrew Herrmann - Nov. 16
“This time of year, around the anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Chicago sporting goods magnate Milton P. Klein would grow moody. For he could not help but be reminded of his awful place in history as the man who sold Lee Harvey Oswald the rifle used to kill JFK.”

Photos evoke memories of day JFK died, by Bill Cunniff - Nov. 14
“Aurora resident Michael Sawdey was a sophomore at the University of Michigan in 1963. On Nov. 22, as he was emerging from the darkroom after processing film for the school yearbook, television was reporting the shocking news that President Kennedy had been shot.”

Chicago Tribune

Warhol puts focus on JFK’s assassination, by Michael Kilian - Nov. 23
“In an exhibition opening this weekend, Pittsburgh’s Andy Warhol Museum expands upon that connection with a wealth of visual and archival material from The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, housed in the Dallas book depository from which Lee Harvey Oswald allegedly fired the bullets that killed Kennedy 40 years ago.”

The Grassy Knoll Society, by Jason Krause - Nov. 18
“Ten years ago, around the 30th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, things seemed to be going pretty well for conspiracy buffs. Oliver Stone’s movie “JFK” had come out a few years earlier, re-igniting interest in the event and stoking the dying flames of the conspiracy industry. The movie even helped goad Congress to pass a law declassifying all assassination-related records. Almost every major publication had anniversary stories of some sort, and public opinion surveys indicated that a solid majority of the public did not believe the official theory that Lee Harvey Oswald alone shot the president.”

JFK’s legacy lost amid many questions, by Charles M. Madigan - Nov. 16
“The dominant thought in the late 1950s was that nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union was a distinct possibility. Moscow had taken the advantage in space with Sputnik, which panicked the Western world. Nikita Khrushchev, Stalin’s successor, was in no way benign. The Kremlin had the weapons and the rockets to deliver them.”

Christian Science Monitor

The Kennedy legacy, by Daniel Schorr - Nov. 21
“According to the latest Census, a majority of Americans – 57.5 percent, to be exact – are under 40 years of age. Thus, most Americans have no personal memory of that fateful day of Nov. 22, 1963, when President Kennedy was assassinated. For this generation, names like Lee Harvey Oswald and the Warren Commission are merely trivia quiz questions.”

JFK assassination: its evolving hold on the national psyche, by Kris Axtman - Nov. 21
“Seventh-graders Samantha Block and Julia Ferguson have spent the past few weeks watching videos on the assassination of John F. Kennedy. They’ve written poems on their feelings about the day that shook their hometown – and the nation – 40 years ago; they’ve even interviewed people who were alive when Kennedy was killed. And now, after touring the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, they say they kind of get it.”

How Dallas came to terms with tragedy, by Hal Smith - Nov. 20
“The gunfire that felled President John Kennedy 40 years ago on Saturday was an event so searing that millions of people, not just in America but worldwide, can still recall in vivid detail the moment they learned the news. Almost lost in that moment is the fact that those bullets left other casualties in Dallas that day and caused grave injury to the standing of the city itself.”

Dallas Morning News

A city under the spotlight, by David Flick - Nov. 21
“Interest in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, which has waxed and waned over the 40 years since his murder in Dallas, has reached an intensity this year unmatched in two decades.”

In a flash, joy turned into grief, by Steve Blow - Nov. 21
” It’s hard to imagine that this humble building was once one of the grandest structures in all of Dallas. But on a beautiful autumn noonday, exactly 40 years ago tomorrow, it was the epicenter of Dallas pride. It was where President John F. Kennedy was to address an enormous luncheon of Dallas dignitaries. Gifts for Caroline and John-John were on hand. A welcoming delegation stood at the ready.”

Pain lingers for Tippit’s widow, by Michael Granberry - Nov. 21
“For the widow of Dallas police Officer J.D. Tippit, the hardest weeks came just after the murder. Curtis, her youngest, would sit by the window night after night, wondering when Daddy was coming home. It was small consolation to a 5-year-old boy that his father was killed doing a job he loved. Or that his death at the hands of Lee Harvey Oswald led to the capture of President John F. Kennedy’s apparent assassin.”

JFK’s death remains most stunning event for this reporter, by Carl P. Leubsdorf - Nov. 21
“Forty years later, I can still recall my sense of shock as I recognized that the frantic words coming out of my bedroom radio told of the assassination of a president.”

The murder that wouldn’t die, by Karen Patterson - Nov. 17
“The killing of John F. Kennedy left a deep and stunning gash in the national psyche. Who President Kennedy was, what he represented, and the optimism of his era made his slaying psychologically personal to much of the nation.Beneath that scar, mistrust and disillusionment still fester products of a profound national grief, the mystery surrounding the murder, and nagging notions of what might have been.”

Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Reporting a tragic day in Fort Worth and Dallas, by Jack B. Tinsley - Nov. 22
“Nov. 22, 1963, was a day of days in a 27-year-old reporter’s life. The historic events and the news coverage in which I participated in Fort Worth and Dallas seem almost as vivid now as they did 40 years ago.”

JFK’s legacy, by Bill Miller - Nov. 22
“As hundreds of people poured into Dealey Plaza on Friday to reflect on the assassination of John F. Kennedy, three men who knew him intimately recalled how he lived.”

Crowds honor Kennedy, leave mementos, by Bill Miller - Nov. 22
“The sorrowful, the sincere and the silly poured into Dealey Plaza on Saturday to observe the 40th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination.”

Memories of JFK, by Eva-Marie Ayala - Nov. 22
“A young girl waited late into the evening at Carswell Air Force Base in Fort Worth to shake the hand of the arriving president. An eighth-grader who met him the next morning was especially interested in his shoes.”

City’s gift to Kennedy is unaccounted for, by Bud Kennedy - Nov. 22
“No souvenir has ever symbolized Fort Worth and Texas like the Shady Oak Western hat, given to nine presidents since 1923 in a tradition begun by Star-Telegram Publisher Amon G. Carter Sr. We gave Kennedy a Western hat at the morning breakfast at the Hotel Texas, now the Radisson Plaza Fort Worth.”

Kennedy photos displayed at Sixth Floor Museum, by Penny Cockerell - Nov. 21 (AP)
“One frame shows John F. Kennedy putting on socks while aboard his family’s private plane. In the next shot, he’s napping with a mask over his eyes. Another frame shows his arrival at an Oregon airport to about a half-dozen greeters on the tarmac.”

Assassination anniversary to bring crowds to Dealey Plaza, by Billy Miller - Nov. 21
“The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza, 411 Elm St., will be the site of much of the activity. Lee Harvey Oswald is believed to have shot Kennedy from a sixth-floor window of the building, which then served as the Texas School Book Depository.”

JFK assassination theories continue to thrive, by John Austin - Nov. 21
“Forty years after his death, nowhere is the memory of John F. Kennedy more alive than in the ongoing drama over who killed him and why.”

Stitches In Time, by Allyson Reynolds Dixon - Nov. 21
“After John Kennedy’s death in 1963, a pair of North Central Texas women decided to preserve his memory using thread and patches of cloth. Ruth Buckhanan and Frances Harris sewed and pieced a quilt memorializing Kennedy’s life and death, completing the project titled ‘A Texas Quilt for JFK’ in 1966.”

Kennedy tribute has ‘Mass’ appeal, by Wayne Lee Gay - Nov. 21
“Forty years to the day after John F. Kennedy fell to an assassin’s bullet in Dallas, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra will commemorate the event with a performance of the eclectic theater piece written in the late president’s honor by his friend Leonard Bernstein in 1971.”

Inspiration, anyone? by Linda Campbell - Nov. 20
“Word about the assassination traveled across our dusty playground in a gruesome way, with a boorish boy playfully mimicking being shot in the head. His rude re-enactment was mystifying until we were called back to our classrooms, where the nuns told us that the president was dead.”

History Channel errs with ‘outrageous’ assassination series, by Bud Kennedy - Nov. 20
“The network’s publicity announcement for The Guilty Men, one of several new episodes of the what-if series The Men Who Killed Kennedy, said the show is focused on the ‘darkest and most challenging area’ of the assassination.”

40 years later, Valenti says JFK assassination ‘seared’ in memory, by Sharon Theimer - Nov. 20

“Jack Valenti, who was riding six cars back in President Kennedy’s motorcade, didn’t hear the gunfire. But when the car in front of him suddenly sped off, he knew something was wrong.”

Historians see similarities, differences in Kennedy, Bush, by Bobby Ross Jr. - Nov. 18
“A product of elite Eastern schools, he had won the presidency three years before in one of the closest elections in history. The losing candidate had been the other party’s two-term vice president, who appeared stiff on television.”

Experts: Presidency more difficult after Kennedy, by Bobby Ross Jr. - Nov. 18
“Not only is the scrutiny more intense in an era of 24-hour news channels and constantly updated Web sites, but public respect for the office has diminished.”

Ford stands behind Warren findings, by Bill Miller - Nov. 17
“The only surviving member of the Warren Commission stands by the panel’s conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, though he says he’s open to the possibility that new evidence might show there was a conspiracy.”

Conspiracy theories abound 40 years after Kennedy’s death, by Penny Cockerell - Nov. 16
“Thousands of books and 40 years later, the theories about President John F. Kennedy’s assassination keep coming. As do the conspiracy theorists, with their volumes of research, meetings around the country and busy Internet chat rooms.”

List of some conspiracy theories surrounding assassination - (AP) Nov. 16
“Here are a few of the unconventional conspiracy theories surrounding John F. Kennedy’s assassination on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Image is everything, by Ken Parish Perkins - Nov. 16
“John F. Kennedy’s eyes were small and piercing, his hair dark and thick. From the side, his head looked square, sort of like a block of ice; his nose was irregular at the tip, his chin strong and circular in a way that made men who stood next to him appear weak. Kennedy’s face was often pale, the skin of a person who rarely ventured outdoors, yet the pallor was never particularly disconcerting because images of football-tossing Kennedys gave the impression of a vigorous man.”

It’s not just a car — it’s a piece of history, by Bud Kennedy - Nov. 11
“The item: the white 1963 Lincoln convertible from the presidential motorcade that took Kennedy from a Fort Worth hotel to board a fateful flight to Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Houston Chronicle

Connally book gives personal view of Kennedy assassination, by Fritz Lanham - Nov. 15
“For those old enough to remember, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy and the wounding of Texas Gov. John Connally in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, have become like part of our DNA, an event that burrowed into the marrow, ever after defining a part of us.”

Neurosurgeon shares his memories of JFK, by Ken Hoffman - Nov. 14
“He cradled John F. Kennedy’s head and turned it, parting the president’s hair so that he could examine the wound caused by an assassin’s bullet on that unforgettable day in Dallas, almost four decades ago.”

Indianapolis Star

In home state, focus is kept on JFK’s life, by Karen Testa -  (APNov. 16
“Perhaps it’s out of respect for a family that has endured repeated tragedies. Perhaps it’s because the shock — though four decades old — remains fresh in so many memories. Perhaps it’s because life is easier to celebrate than death.”

‘Stop the presses!’ newsman shouted, by Don Baker - Nov. 15
“Managing Editor Irving Leibowitz, whose desk was on the other side of the machine, and I watched in horror as the teletype interrupted a routine story in midsentence with these words: BULLETIN PRECEDE KENNEDY DALLAS, NOV. 22 (UPI) — THREE SHOTS WERE FIRED TODAY AT PRESIDENT KENNEDY’S MOTORCADE IN DOWNTOWN DALLAS. Leibo and I were quickly joined at the machine by Frank Widner, assistant managing editor. Then one of them shouted the words I had heard before only in the movies: ‘Stop the presses!’”

JFK’s death revisited, by Don Baker - Nov. 15
“The events of those 96 hours are re-created in haunting, minute-by-minute detail in this multimedia project that commemorates the 40th anniversary of JFK’s assassination. His death, along with the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, constitutes a defining moment in recent American history.”

Los Angeles Times

Family Members Visit Kennedy’s Grave Nov. 22 (AP)
“His daughter, Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg, his brother, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., and others knelt before the eternal flame that is a memorial to the late president and laid flowers on the stones.”

The Timeless Image of Grief and Sorrow, Commentary by David M. Lubin - Nov. 21
“Some of the 20th century’s best-known, most often reproduced news photographs and footage emerged from a single weekend the one that began Nov. 22, 1963, with the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.”

Conspiracy Theories Have Run Their Course, Commentary by Richard M. Mosk - Nov. 11
“Each fall for 40 years we have remembered the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963. This year’s decennial anniversary, however, may well be remarkable for what will be missing: myriad articles and discussions debunking the Warren Commission’s conclusion that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone.”

“John F. Kennedy’s presidency lasted a thousand days, and he has died a thousand deaths. The CIA killed him. The Mob killed him. Corsican gangsters killed him. Dallas oilmen killed him. Fidel Castro killed him. Cuban exiles killed him. The Diem family killed him. There’s even a new book that says Lyndon Johnson killed him.”

LBJ Aides Call JFK Conspiracy Doc a Smear, by Lynn Elber – (APNov. 19
“A television documentary claiming Lyndon B. Johnson helped plot the Kennedy assassination was condemned as an absurd smear by Johnson’s family and former staff members. A History Channel film that aired Monday alleges that then-Vice President Johnson and members of his staff were responsible for President Kennedy’s 1963 killing, said LBJ Foundation Chairman Tom Johnson, no relation to the former president.”

Then-First Lady of Texas Writes JFK Book, by T.A. Badger – (AP) Nov. 4
“A week or so after President Kennedy was assassinated, Nellie Connally grabbed a legal pad and a couple of pens and found a quiet place in the governor’s mansion to write down what she remembered about the tragic event.”

ABC assassination review pins Oswald, by Mark Washburn - Oct. 31
“Using a computer imaging process roughly akin to video games, ABC News has constructed a forensic tableau that it says proves Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone in assassinating President John F. Kennedy.”

ABC special out to debunk JFK conspiracy theories, by David Bauder - Oct. 30
“ABC News has conducted an exhaustive investigation of the Kennedy assassination, complete with a computer-generated reconstruction, which irrefutably confirms that Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone, the network said.”

New York Times

Remembering John F. Kennedy Nov. 22
“Forty years after his death, John F. Kennedy and his cruelly abbreviated presidency continue to resist generalization. It will probably always be thus. His tenure was too short to produce the coherent patterns favored by historians, too consumed by emergencies at home and abroad to leave much time for grand strategies.”

Another Master of the Senate, an Op-Ed by Sean Wilentz - Nov. 21
“Some years after John F. Kennedy’s assassination 40 years ago tomorrow a counter-Camelot myth took hold among historians and journalists. Supposedly, Kennedy was a reckless cold warrior, knee-deep in conspiracies against Fidel Castro. On domestic policy, he was timid and ineffective.”

Fleeting Wisp of Glory, and Eloquence, by Clyde Haberman - Nov. 21
“Maybe his image was created in part with smoke and mirrors. Maybe a complaisant press corps overlooked his moral and physical frailties. Maybe his road to the White House went through cemetery gates in Chicago that Democratic bosses had opened to pump up the vote.”

Freed From Conspiracy, an Op-Ed by Thomas Mallon - Nov. 21
“In considering John F. Kennedy at this 40-year remove, the ultimate “what if” may involve what America might be like had the country been denied the president’s violent death, with its long psychic burden, instead of the rest of his life.”

Dallas Comes to Terms With the Day That Defined It, by Ralph Blumenthal - Nov. 20
“Days after President John F. Kennedy and Lee Harvey Oswald were gunned down in this city in November 1963, Brig. Gen. Herbert A. Hall, retired in Tucson, folded a large, beribboned certificate into an envelope and mailed it to the mayor of Dallas, Earle Cabell.”

How the Death of a President Led to the Birth of a Medium, by Alessandra Stanley - Nov. 19
“The swirl of interviews, documentaries and specials building up to Nov. 22 are no

um was swept into power and forever changed American culture and politics.”

Revisiting That Historic Day in Dallas, in Many Specials - Nov. 19
“All the 40th-anniversary specials on John F. Kennedy’s assassination include gripping images, some iconically familiar, others, like scenes of a surly Lee Harvey Oswald proclaiming his innocence to reporters after his arrest, more rare. Here are some of the more interesting specials.”

The 40th Anniversary of a 26-Second Reel, by Richard B. Woodward - Nov. 15
“The most valuable piece of film in the world sits in a refrigerated, fireproof safe at a National Archives building in College Park, Md. The work of a complete amateur, who used a Bell & Howell eight-millimeter home movie camera that his secretary had convinced him to bring to work, it is only 26 seconds long.”

40 Years After Shots in Dallas, a Survivor’s Painful Memories, by Ralph Blumenthal - Oct. 31
“In a luxury apartment tower rearing over the city’s toniest shopping district, Nellie Connally pauses, her rush of words sudde

ly stilled. ‘It’s hard to explain,’ she continues after a moment. ‘You can’t believe the horror of being in that car.’”

USA Today

Constitution works when leader falls, an Editorial by Jack Valenti - Nov. 21
“But it also was the day the nation witnessed a miracle. As I later realized with unfathomable awe, everything that had been written down in Philadelphia so long ago by the men who created this nation worked. In today’s turbulent times, there is a lesson here, and a comfort too, in knowing that our democratic system can withstand the most horrific of events.
Company to do computer recreation of Kennedy assassination - Nov. 20
“A New Hampshire 3-D computer animation and multimedia company has put together a computerized recreation of President Kennedy’s assassination for a series shown on Court TV.”

JFK’s assassination still fascinates 40 years later, by Peter Johnson - Nov. 10
“The media love anniversaries, especially ones that end in zero. But the upcoming 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy will be a full-court press. Coverage of this anniversary, observers say, is particularly intense for reasons that eclipse the usual fascination with Kennedy’s death and an endless national obsession with the Kennedy family.”Washington Post

Tragedy Becomes History, by Lee Hockstader - Nov. 22
“On a brilliant November midday, the morbid, the conspiracy-minded and the simply curious still pick their way around Dealey Plaza. They turn a gimlet eye at the grassy knoll and the old School Book Depository building, part with some pocket money for the lurid pamphlets and CDs peddled by a dozen hawkers, and scamper across Elm Street ahead of onrushing traffic, pausing for a split second at the X painted on the fresh asphalt.”

The Day a Generation’s Spirit Died, by Ken Ringle - Nov. 22
“Despite the predictable outpouring of television retrospectives from conspiracy theorists and Camelot nostalgia buffs, it is extremely difficult for those under a certain age to understand everything that died in Dallas 40 years ago, and why we are today in some ways so very much a poorer country.”

Ink and Tears: A Reporter’s Diary, by Richard L. Homan - Nov. 22
“The shock to me was almost physical when I heard about it. The full feeling of grief did not come until today. I can describe it best and most simply by saying that his death affected me as deeply as any death has ever affected me.”

Forensic Files: The Assassination of JFK, by Paul Dowling - Nov. 20
“Court TV’s “Forensic Files” takes a new look at the forensics behind President Kennedy’s assassination investigation on Nov. 19 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, including a controversial piece of evidence that may hold clues to whether there was just one gunmen — or more. “The JFK Assassination: Investigation Reopened” uses modern forensic science to evaluate the Dallas police audio recording that has long been thought to contain the sounds of the gunshots that killed the president.”

Forty Years Later, a Look Back at the Horror of 11/22, Column by Tom Shales - Nov. 17
“At the time, I worked for a small radio station in the Midwest. Five loud bells from the AP teletype machine meant a big story was coming over, a bulletin. The first thing that always happened in such cases is that the machine would break down, or jam, and we’d all have to guess what the catastrophic story might be as it typed out gibberish.”

Jackie Kennedy’s Spiritual Crisis, by Caryle Murphy - Nov. 13
“A few months after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, a grief-stricken Jacqueline Kennedy told a Catholic priest that she had thought about suicide as a way to escape her desolation and rejoin her husband, according to excerpts from the priest’s diary made available yesterday by Georgetown University.”

Washington Times

On an assassin’s trail - Nov. 21
“This is the second of two excerpts from “‘JFK: Breaking the News’ (International Focus Press) by Hugh Aynesworth, Dallas bureau chief of The Washington Times. Mr. Aynesworth, as a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, witnessed the assassination of JFK, the arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald and the killing of Oswald by Jack Ruby.”

LBJ family, former staffers enraged by film of Nov. 22 - (APNov. 20
“A television documentary asserting that Lyndon B. Johnson helped plot the Kennedy assassination was condemned as an absurd smear by Johnson’s family and former staff members.”

Witness to a murder Nov. 20
“This is the first of two excerpts from “JFK: Breaking the News” (International Focus Press) by Hugh Aynesworth, Dallas bureau chief of The Washington Times. Mr. Aynesworth, as a reporter for the Dallas Morning News, witnessed the assassination of JFK, the arrest of Lee Harvey Oswald and the killing of Oswald by Jack Ruby.”

New JFK assassination evidence revealed - (UPINov. 14
“The neurosurgeon on duty at Dallas’s Parkland Memorial Hospital when John F. Kennedy was assassinated is offering his first public account of the event.”College and University Press
Nation marks JFK anniversary, by Corbin H. Crable - Kansas State Collegian – Nov. 21
“People and locations key to the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on Nov. 22, 1963, will recognize the 40th anniversary of the president’s murder this weekend. In Dallas, where Kennedy was killed, the Sixth Floor Museum, housed in the Texas Schoolbook Depository, is expecting an increase in visitors, said Dawn Wyatt, public relations director for the museum. To accommodate the increase, Wyatt said, the museum will have extended hours from Friday until Sunday.”

Kennedy Timeline, by Corbin H. Crable - Kansas State Collegian – Nov. 21
“12:30 p.m.: President Kennedy is shot. Eyewitness Abraham Zapruder captures the entire scene on 8mm film, which government officials will heavily utilize in their research of the assassination. The motorcade immediately heads to Parkland Memorial Hospital.”

Kennedy image varies through generations, by Brian Chalton - Michigan State News – Nov. 21
“Forty years have passed since a fatal shot froze time around the world. Forty years and John F. Kennedy remains the subject of prime-time television specials that lure another generation into obsession with his life and his death. And to many people who never saw the assassinated president alive, Kennedy is a pop-culture icon.”

40 years later, an Opinion - Michigan State News – Nov. 21
“On this, the 40th anniversary of President John. F. Kennedy’s assassination, we pause to remember the life of a man who left behind a legacy. After graduating from Harvard in 1940, Kennedy entered the Navy where he earned the Navy and Marine Corps Medal for leadership and courage.”

BSU recalls JFK’s visit, by Lauren Phillips - Ball State Daily News – Nov. 21
“As Americans reflect on the 40th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination, some might remember the day he was shot or his push for civil rights. Louis Ingelhart, Ball State professor emeritus, remembers Kennedy the man, as well as his visit to Ball State before he campaigned for the presidency.”

Forty years later, we must recall JFK’s legacy, Column by Jonathan Menitove - Yale Daily News – Nov. 21
“Forty years ago, on Nov. 22, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. Of course, all of our

parents remember when they heard the news on that late-November day. Some of them even choke up. Our parents recall how President Kennedy embodied optimism, hope and a spirit that the American ideal would prevail, provided that citizens put their country’s interests ahead of their own.”

Community remembers JFK’s death, by Jen WInberry - Penn State Collegian – Nov. 21
“Tomorrow marks the 40th anniversary of the shots that rang out and changed the course of history. On November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas on a visit to the city. While the event took place 40 years ago and hundreds of miles away, the Penn State community is still commemorating the day.”

Everyone was there when Kennedy died, by Martin Snapp - Berkely Voice – Nov. 21
“Mayor Tom Bates was a young Army lieutenant stationed in Germany when he heard the news. His future wife, Assemblywoman Loni Hancock, was in New York City. Police Chief Roy Meisner was a freshman at Los Gatos High School, home that day with the flu.”

Students study Kennedy assassination, by Emily Powell - SMU Daily News – Nov. 21
“As the world remembers the infamous John F. Kennedy assassination on its 40th anniversary, students at SMU have the opportunity to delve into the long-running controversy in the Cultural Formations course, Making History.”

Conspiracy theories abound, by Richard Clough - Daily Bruin – Nov. 21
“The JFK assassination is perhaps the most substantial and significant event of the 20th century, and it has elicited much speculation as to whom was ultimately responsible.”

Kennedy Letters to McSorley Released, by Derek Richmond - Georgetown Hoya – Nov. 19
“On the eve of the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Georgetown University has made public correspondence that took place between Kennedy’s widow and a late Georgetown Jesuit. The letters reveal that Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis contemplated suicide after her husband’s death.”


Other Coverage

Monday, November 24

Doubts persist on JFK assassin, by Michael A. Fuoco - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
“Four days of presentations covering virtually every aspect of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy ended last night at Duquesne University with Dr. Cyril H. Wecht exhorting fellow Warren Commission critics to continue to fight for a re-examination of the case.”

Thousands pay tribute to Kennedy BBC News
“Thousands of people in Dallas, Texas, have marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination there of United States President John F Kennedy. At the Arlington Cemetery near Washington DC, Kennedy family members prayed at the eternal flame which marks the 35th president’s grave.”

Sunday, November 23

Worshipping JFK, Column by William F. Buckley - Town Hall
“I was asked by a television network to comment on the career of President Kennedy. I agreed to do so and do not know how many other views were solicited, or when the program was aired. I have to assume that it went out because the 40th anniversary of the assassination seemed to wipe out all unrelated television fare with the exception of Michael Jackson, who got if not equal time, very nearly that.”

Will the ghosts ever fade? A veteran reporter knows the answer to that question, by John Tackett - San Antonio Express-News
“When people have learned over the years that I was there, the first question they always ask is whether I believe it was a one-man, one-gun crime. I do, and I don’t engage in conspiracy arguments any more. I see no reason to. With a few details left in question, I believe the Warren Commission Report was rock solid in finding Oswald guilty.”

Kennedy’s career was too short, but his impact lives on, an Editorial - Gainesville Times
“Kennedy, the nation’s 35th president, brought to office an elan and style that 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. had never before seen. Forty-three years old when he was elected in 1960, he started his term with optimism and excitement. Anything was possible. Any dream might come true.”

An Anniversary to Remember, by Katie Thomas - Newsday
“Yesterday marked four decades since bullets tore through John F. Kennedy as he rode through Dallas in the back of a convertible. Half a lifetime has passed since his blood spattered Jackie Kennedy’s pink dress and stained the nation’s collective memory.”

Visitors Pause at the Eternal Flame, by Robert Gutsche, Jr. - Newsday
“At one point yesterday morning, about 60 people crowded the steps overlooking Washington and bent over a chain fence to look upon the hissing orange flame. It altered shape and direction with the wind, slowly moving from the east to the north.”

Lamm: JFK’s death a ‘loss of innocence,’ Column by Dianne Carman - Denver Post
“On the day that John F. Kennedy died, my mother, who had voted for Richard Nixon, wept. Schools across the U.S. canceled classes. Businesses closed. Television programming was interrupted for days as nonstop news coverage consumed a nation.”

Dallas remembers the day JFK died, by Jon Herskovitz - Toronto Star
“Conspiracy theorists flocked to the infamous grassy knoll yesterday and parents pointed toward a sixth-floor window as thousands gathered in Dealey Plaza to mark the day, 40 years ago, when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated on a trip through Dallas.”

Perhaps we remember it too much, Column by Ed Quillen - Denver Post
“When I started pondering the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, I knew that most Americans my age – if not all – remember exactly where they were and what they were doing when the news arrived.”

‘We’ll never be young again,’ Column by Fred Brown - Denver Post
“Three of every five Americans weren’t yet born when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated 40 years ago. Eliminate those who were toddlers or younger, and something less than a third of us can remember where we were on that unforgettable November day.”

Saturday, November 22

Forty years later, the JFK cult has faded, by Christopher Hitchens - Wall Street Journal (Opinion Journal)
“A short while ago, I chanced to be in Dallas making a documentary film. One of the shots involved a camera angle from a big commercial tower overlooking Dealey Plaza and the former “book depository,” and it was later necessary for us to take the road through the celebrated underpass. The crew I worked with was younger than I am (you may as well make that much younger) and consisted of a Chinese-Australian, an English girl brought up in Africa, a Jewish guy from Brooklyn and other elements of a cross-section.”

Novak: Kennedy’s death ‘something I’ll never forget’ CNN
“On the day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated, CNN contributor and syndicated columnist Robert Novak was a 32-year-old journalist working in Washington with fellow columnist, the late Roland “Rowly” Evans. Novak recently visited Kennedy’s grave and the eternal flame memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. He shared his memories of November 22, 1963.”

Wallace: ‘This place is stirring strong emotions’ CNN
“CNN national correspondent Kelly Wallace joined the thousands gathered in Dallas for Saturday’s anniversary and spoke with CNN anchor Catherine Callaway about how people were remembering the president.”

JFK case still not closed, by Joe Havely - CNN
“Like the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and the terrorist strikes of September 11, 2001, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy was a defining moment in American and world history.”

Thousands pay tribute to Kennedy BBC News
“Thousands of people in Dallas, Texas, have marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination there of United States President John F Kennedy. At the Arlington Cemetery near Washington DC, Kennedy family members prayed at the eternal flame which marks the 35th president’s grave.”

JFK: The simple truth, by Gavin Esler - BBC News
“The assassination of the 35th President of the United States 40 years ago in Dallas, Texas, came at a particularly tense point in the Cold War. Kennedy’s successor Lyndon Johnson immediately realised that if – as many suspected – the Cubans or the Russians had conspired to kill Kennedy then the result would be a nuclear war.”

In his life, we loved him more — and in death, the Beatle-like myth of JFK shows his dream isn’t over, by James Sullivan - San Francisco Chronicle
“In his new book “Magic Circles: The Beatles in Dream and History,” author Devin McKinney considers the transformation that gripped the famous foursome as they evolved from teen phenomenon into something utterly different, something at once cagey and experimental.”

40 years: An important marker for a critical event , by Tyrone Beason - Seattle Times
“People remember exactly where they were and what they were doing when they heard the news that President John F. Kennedy was dead. Educators, politicians and even young people who came of age long after the 1960s say JFK’s assassination may be as meaningful now as on that tragic Dallas afternoon 40 years ago today.”

Assassin’s bullet still causes pain, by Mike Lewis - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“The gym teacher looked like a Marine with a whistle. Always addressed as Mr. Maxwell, he was thick, wore a crew cut, lacked a neck and barked such phrases as, ‘hop to it.’ When angry, he would swat his offender with a sneaker the size of small canoe. Or so it seemed.”

America Remembers JFK Al Jazeera
“Americans are marking the 40th anniversary of the assassination of one of their most beloved presidents, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, whose death remains shrouded in mystery to this day.”

JFK remembered ABC News
“The United States has solemnly remembered president John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas, Texas 40 years ago.”

Thousands Remember Kennedy in Dallas - ABC News (AP)
“Thousands of mourners, conspiracy theorists and the just plain curious gathered Saturday along the downtown street where President John F. Kennedy was assassinated 40 years earlier, with many of them recalling where they had been at the very moment they heard the news.”

JFK galvanized a nation Denver Post
“For a generation of Americans, the shots that rang out 40 years ago in Dallas still echo in their souls, and the tears from that sorrowful day have never quite dried.”

Are memories of JFK fading? by Mike Kilen - Des Moines Register
“Most young Americans place him in a mental archive of dusty presidential images and voices. The Abe Lincoln portrait. The crackling recording of Franklin Roosevelt’s “nothing to fear” address. The black-and-white videotape of Kennedy saying, ‘Ich bin ein Berliner.’”

Camelot…Not, Column by Neil Cavuto - Town Hall
“It was one of those small things that usually go unnoticed in TV news coverage. A news network (not my own) teased two upcoming stories. I’m not quoting it exactly, but it went something like, ‘a look back on JFK then a look forward to Michael Jackson.’ Two compelling issues joined at the electronic hip. I half expected the next tease to read, ‘from the King of Pop to the guy who got popped. Next!’”

Forty years ago, Column by Jay Bryant - Town Hall
“As has been truly said repeatedly, every American then alive remembers the moment he or she heard about the assassination of President John F. Kennedy forty years ago. Younger folks can compare it to the similar remembrance they will always have of where they were when they heard about the attacks on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.”

Photographer remembers ‘John-John’ salute, by Tobin Beck - UPI
“UPI photographer Stan Stearns took the picture outside St. Matthew’s Cathedral, after the Kennedy family emerged from the church following the funeral of President John F. Kennedy on Monday, Nov. 25, 1963. He was assassinated 

Nov. 22, 1963, in Dallas.”

SMC professor shares JFK knowledge, by Barbara Dempsey - South Bend Tribune
“And this weekend, as he boils his years of researching evidence on the head wounds of the late President John F. Kennedy into a 40-minute presentation in Pittsburgh at a national symposium on the assassination of Nov. 22, 1963, he faces a weighty challenge of his own. And that is trying to convince some of the most noted researchers in the world on the subject that he has, in fact, uncovered a limited conspiracy involving leading forensic pathologists and an illustrator who worked on the case”

Kennedy remembered as civil rights ally, by May Lee Johnson - South Bend Tribune
“A longtime local civil rights pioneer who worked on the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964 says the legacy of President John F. Kennedy is bringing the civil rights movement to the forefront of the nation’s consciousness.”

Buffalo’s affection for Kennedy endures, by Robert J. McCarthy - Buffalo News
“As the nation pauses to mark the anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination, so does a city with strong political and cultural bonds to the Massachusetts senator who later became the nation’s 35th president. And while many of the key Buffalo figures who helped John Kennedy along his road to the White House are now gone, there remains a strong local identification with a man who influenced an entire generation, and who still commands powerful emotions among those he left behind. “

The JFK mystique, by Charles Madigan - Buffalo News
“The dominant thought in the late 1950s was that nuclear war between the United States and the Soviet Union was a distinct possibility. Moscow had taken the advantage in space with Sputnik, which panicked the Western world. Nikita Khrushchev, Stalin’s successor, was in no way benign. The Kremlin had the weapons and the rockets to deliver them.”

Lakeland Radio Reporter Got Close to Assassin, by Gary White - Ledger
“The assassination of President John F. Kennedy spawned something that has become common in the subsequent 40 years: a media frenzy. Along with such TV correspondents as Dan Rather and Robert McNeil, those covering the aftermath of the shooting in Dallas included a 21-year-old reporter from a Lakeland radio station.”

Former Students Recall Dark Day, by Suzie Schottelkotte - Ledger
“In November 1963, those in Summerlin Institute’s senior class in Bartow felt confident about their future. The country seemed to be moving in the right direction, led by a young president with whom they felt a connection.”

Local Leaders Recall Meeting John Kennedy, by Bill Rufty - Ledger
“State Sen. Scott Kelly, a candidate for governor, had just finished a luncheon speech to the Jacksonville Civitan Club on Nov. 22, 1963, when he was told that President John F. Kennedy had been shot in Dallas”

The JFK Legacy Salt Lake Tribune
“Utahns alive 40 years ago today might have learned of John F. Kennedy’s fate from the bells of the Cathedral of the Madeleine in Salt Lake City, which tolled for 15 minutes without stopping upon official word of the president’s death.”

Kennedy in Utah: Charming a solidly Republican Utah, by Dawn House - Salt Lake Tribune
“It was Richard Nixon — not John F. Kennedy — who captured the hearts of Utahns in the 1960 presidential race, including that of beloved Mormon Church President David O. McKay.”

JFK’s commitment to service Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette
“The eloquent lines from his inauguration remain among those most remembered from his thousand days in office: “And so my fellow Americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” Public service can hold many meanings, but Kennedy’s message was specific. He wanted a government workforce that attracted the nation’s most talented and idealistic people.”

Still today, a sense of loss Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette
“The nation would continue to grieve the loss of its president during the next several months, but none of the memories of those days of mourning sting like those of the first moments when the news arrived 40 years ago today.”

JFK’s unspoken words, an Editorial - St. Petersburg Times
“We in this country, in this generation, are – by destiny rather than choice – the watchman on the walls of world 

freedom. We ask, therefore, that we may be worthy of our power and responsibility, that we may exercise our strength with wisdom and restraint, and that we may achieve in our time the ancient vision of peace on earth, goodwill toward men.”

JFK, portraits from memory, by Tom Zucco - St. Petersburg Times
“People in their 50s and older don’t need much more prompting. It’s the faceless brick building in downtown Dallas, the place where Lee Harvey Oswald used a $21.45 mail order rifle to fire three shots from a sixth-floor window and assassinate President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago today.”

JFK, 40 years later Rocky Mountain News
“To many, this charming, witty, youthful leader – the first president born in the 20th century – seemed a symbol of a new vitality in a land that had experienced relative quiet in the decade prior to his election. He seemed filled with promise, but that promise was cut short, and it was as if history had been robbed.”

A day that changed people’s lives Sarasota Herald Tribune
“Over the weekend, America paused to reflect upon events that occurred 50 years ago. For the majority of our population, Pearl Harbor is but an event that they read about in a history book. For those who actually remember Dec. 7, 1941, the inevitable question is: ‘Where were you when you heard the news about the sneak attack by the Japanese?’”

Death of a president JFK’s assassination was an attack on all Americans Sarasota Herald Tribune
“Most remembrances have focused on Kennedy the man, and for understandable reasons. Camelot, starring JFK, was good theater. Kennedy was the charismatic, enigmatic, idealistic leader of a new generation of Americans. He was the first telegenic president and the last president to be assassinated.”

Conspiracy tales profitable fiction Sarasota Herald Tribune
“I was deeply disturbed as I watched the shows this week that marked the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. According to current polls, a majority of Americans now believe that his murder was the result of a conspiracy.”

Sen. Inouye recalls eerie calm after JFK’s death, by Mary Adamski - Honolulu Star-Bulletin
“Like any American over the age of 50, Hawaii’s senior senator has a vivid memory of the moment on Nov. 22, 1963, when he learned that President John F. Kennedy was shot.”

Friday, November 21

JFK: We still wonder what might have been, Column by William C. Kashatus - Seattle Times
“After 40 years, the assassination of President John F. Kennedy continues to ignite countless conspiracy theories, rising from the strange circumstances and seemingly inexplicable actions surrounding it.”

A new generation feels little link to JFK, by Beth Gillen - Philadelphia Inquirer
“For more than half of the U.S. population, not yet born on Nov. 22, 1963, Kennedy’s death is an event unclouded by sentiment. It is a truism that baby boomers and their parents can instantly summon what they were doing and how they felt when they got the news from Dallas.”

Classroom sleuths examine JFK’s death, by Terry Bitman - Philadelphia Inquirer
“Erica Regosch believes she knows who killed President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago tomorrow. It was the Mafia. ‘That’s my personal opinion,’ the Williamstown High School senior said yesterday as she presented her and two classmates’ research to their advanced placement government and politics class.”

Kennedy: The enduring allure BBC News
“When the BBC asked me to help make a documentary for the 40th anniversary of President John F Kennedy’s death I was tempted to suggest repeating a Newsnight special I had written for the 20th anniversary in 1983.”

John F. Kennedy, an Editorial - Nation
“A young President, John F. Kennedy must have known or sensed that he did not have all time and eternity to accomplish his major objectives. He was in a hurry to reach the top and he was not long in reaching it. Once there he wanted to get things done, to spin the wheels faster, to move along.”

JFK conspiracy theory 101: A lesson in ambiguity CNN (Reuters)
“The shots rang out in Dallas 40 years ago, and the students’ research papers on assassination conspiracy theories were due on the desk of Southern Methodist University professor Tom Stone earlier this week. Stone has been teaching a course for 10 years on the John F. Kennedy presidential assassination at SMU, a university in Dallas located a few miles north of where Kennedy was gunned down on November 22, 1963.”

Review: All right, who really killed JFK? by L.D. Meagher - CNN
“Forty years later, and there are still questions about the assassination of John F. Kennedy. The intervening decades have seen the rise of an entire industry dedicated to providing answers — lots of answers, many conflicting.  Indeed, one could select virtually any two books on the assassination at random and find in them a wealth of contradictions. So where to look for The Truth?”

Dallas Through the Looking Glass, by David Greenberg - Slate
“In November 1973, on the 10th anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas, the New Left muckraking magazine Ramparts ran a long essay titled ‘From Dallas to Watergate: The Longest Cover-Up.’ The author, Peter Dale Scott, a professor at the University of California at Berkeley, put forth the idea that Kennedy’s murder and the scandals then engulfing the Nixon administration were linked.”

Remembering Air Force One In A Gray Sky, Column by Steve Otto - Tampa Tribune
“If you are of a certain age, you remember exactly where you were and what you were doing in that moment 40 years ago Saturday. The assassination of John F. Kennedy was one of those markers in our lives. For some, it was a watershed moment that drew a psychological line between the end of the 1950s and the true beginning of the 1960s.”

Is Kennedy assassination losing its resonance? by Mary McKee - Akron Beacon Journal
“John Lohnstein’s eyes were glazed with tears as he stood near the spot where President John F. Kennedy was fatally shot. Traffic roared by and a gusty wind whipped around him. But Lohnstein, 69,was undeterred by the distractions, deep in a reverie of painful memories.”

Kennedy Kitsch, by James T. Madore - Newsday
“In a frozen tableau from minutes before an assassin struck, President John F. Kennedy is looking to his right and smiling. Beside him first lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy sits serenely in a pink suit with matching pill-box hat. In front of them are Texas Gov. John Connally and his wife, Nellie, along with a driver who is gripping the steering wheel with both hands.”

In JFK’s death, modern TV news was born, by Tim Cuprison - Arizona Republic
“When Dan Rather took the CBS anchor chair on the terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, after the second World Trade Center tower had been hit, he flashed back 38 years.”

Teachers ponder relevance of Kennedy to today’s students, by Larry Slonaker - San Jose Mercury News
“Some baby boomers remember the John F. Kennedy assassination in 1963 as if it were yesterday. What they sometimes forget is that to many members of subsequent generations, what happened 40 years ago is just another faded black-and-white snapshot from the past.”

Kennedy family say JFK’s heritage applies today, by Dennis Redomont - San Francisco Chronicle (AP)
“Italy honored members of the Kennedy clan Thursday ahead of the 40th anniversary of JFK’s death in a visit that recalled the president’s ‘prophetic and far-reaching vision’ on terrorism, nuclear conflict and a united Europe.”

The Pink Suit, by Delia M. Rios - Ledger
“Not long after that terrible day in Dallas — no one knows exactly when — a brown paper box arrived at the National Archives. The return address was on O Street, the Georgetown home of Jacqueline Kennedy’s mother. Packed inside was the pink Chanel suit first glimpsed Nov. 22, 1963, when the first lady joined JFK at a Fort Worth breakfast, and which, covered in his blood, she still wore the next morning to escort the slain president’s casket into the White House.”

Thursday, November 20

Kennedy, Column by George Will - Town Hall 

“Landing in New York on a speaking trip, the president impulsively decided not to have a motorcade into Manhattan, so his limousine stopped at 10 traffic lights. At one, a woman ran to the car and snapped a photograph inches from his face. A policeman exclaimed, ‘Oh, my God. She could have been an assassin.’ It was Nov. 15, 1963.”

Acts of evil test every generation, Column by Nicole Brodeur - Seattle Times
“Pressed, she couldn’t remember where her 2-year-old was that day. Somewhere in the house, she said. Around. I don’t mind that my mom couldn’t tell me exactly where I was on Nov. 22, 1963  the day John F. Kennedy was shot.”

day television came of age, by Vinay Menon - Toronto Star
“In many ways, the death of John F. Kennedy gave birth to television. Sure, the medium was around long before Nov. 22, 1963. But on that surreal day, as shots rang out in Dallas and confusion engulfed a nation, television was forced to awkwardly mature.”

40 years haven’t dulled memories of JFK, by Marianne Means - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“It’s not as though we would ever forget, nor fail to pass our memories on to our children. But television is typically overdoing it, indulging in dramatic excess.All week there are panels, miniseries, interviews and documentaries reliving the Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of President Kennedy.”

Ex-agent refuses to toe party line on JFK slaying, by Ellen Miller - Rocky Mountain News
“Lee Harvey Oswald didn’t act alone when he killed President John F. Kennedy, a retired agent said Wednesday, and the president died because Secret Service agents failed at their jobs.”

Did Jackie O.’s Priest Betray Her? by Michael McGough - Slate
“In The Kennedys: America’s Emerald Kings, released last month, journalist Thomas Maier reports that the recently widowed Jacqueline Kennedy told the Rev. Richard McSorley she had contemplated suicide. Maier’s book draws on interviews with the late McSorley, excerpts from his diary, and letters from her. Did McSorley violate the storied seal of the confessional by allowing the content of his conversations with Jackie Kennedy to become public?”

Carrying JFK then and now, by David Giffels - Akron Beacon Journal
“So he understood why, 40 years after the fact, I might be interested in his small piece of an American epic. Why I might be interested in a man from Stow who was a pallbearer at one of the most famous funerals in our nation’s history.”

Wednesday, November 19

In The Northwest: We lost JFK, and then we lost a whole lot more, by Joel Connelly - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“While summoning true believers to protest CBS’ TV movie about Ronald and Nancy Reagan, our nation’s conservative talking heads did not for an instant cease their simultaneous, decades-old trashing of the Kennedy family.”

JFK’s Diary Unlocked for Koreans, by Han Eun-Jung - Korea Times
“‘Prelude to Leadership: The European Diary of John F. Kennedy Summer 1945′ unravels the thoughts of a 28-year-old John F. Kennedy. This collection of private entries from a diary kept by the late president sheds light on a side of Kennedy that has never been seen before.”

JFK’s birth, not his death, is important, Column by Rochelle Riley - Detroit Free Press
“President John F. Kennedy was never as large in life as he has become after death. His legacy would never have been so celebrated. For even if he had succeeded at all he set out to do, his accomplishments would have been no match for the emotion evoked by the assassination of a man trying to change the world.”

Making a case for JFK specials, by David Bianculli - New York Daily News
“Conspiracy theorists, consider this: Various cable and broadcast TV networks are presenting specials this week about the John F. Kennedy assassination, and reaching similar conclusions.”

Tuesday, November 18

JFK, plus 40, Column by Cal Thomas - Town Hall
“On election night, 1960, I watched the returns trickle in to Huntley and Brinkley on a black-and-white TV set at an 

t really about the 40th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination. They commemorate the 40th anniversary of television: the day a young, vigorous medi

American University fraternity house in Washington. I was an almost 18-year-old college freshman, and Dwight Eisenhower was the only president I had been aware of.”

Your memories of JFK BBC
“There was shock and disbelief in the United States and around the world. Some compare the impact of Kennedy’s assassination to that of the attacks on the US in September 2001. People alive then remember vividly the moment they heard he had been shot, just as people recall where they were when they first found out about the attacks on Washington and New York.”

‘Our president,’ by Colette Bancroft St. Petersburg Times
“On a bright, beautiful fall day, he landed at MacDill Air Force Base at midday. He lunched at its Officers Club, spoke at Al Lopez Field, the International Inn and Fort Homer Hesterly Armory, and rode in a motorcade through downtown Tampa. He returned to the base to fly on to Miami before dark.”

Coverage of assassination shaped TV’s Sept. 11 role, by Jim Cuprisen - Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
“When Dan Rather first took the CBS anchor chair on the terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, after the second World Trade Center tower had been hit, he flashed back 38 years.”

Monday, November 17

Destiny takes a young president to Dallas, by Nellie Connally and Mickie Herskowitz - Albany Times-Union
“I left Austin for San Antonio at noon on Thursday, November 21. John was in Houston and would arrive shortly after me. It had been almost two years since I had seen the Kennedys, and although John and Jack had been in touch for various reasons, a lot had changed in the meantime. I was looking forward to renewing our friendship.”

The day JFK died, by R.D. Heldfelds - Akron Beacon Journal
“Census figures indicate that about half the current U.S. population wasn’t even born when John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Sunday, November 16

Remembering Kennedy’s life, death, by Mark Dawidziak - Cleveland Plain-Dealer
“It was one of those moments that seemed painfully etched in every American’s consciousness. Yes, you knew where you were and what you were doing at the second you learned about Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

JFK Had Style, Substance, by Les Payne - Newsday
“He was the first candidate I’d seen up close, John F. Kennedy. Wandering out of G. Fox Department store, I got washed up in the current of a political rally stirred by the Kennedy advance men. Just as suddenly, this black sedan dispensed a shock of brown hair who stood erect in blue serge and rasped almost poetically in what seemed like a mockery of a Boston accent.”

Saturday, November 15

Who Killed JFK? After 40 Years, Doubts Remain, by James Toedtman - New York Newsday
“The assassination of President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago jarred the country. A normally stoic Walter Cronkite paused to compose himself as he delivered the news. Men and women wept openly on the streets upon hearing. Then there was Jacqueline Kennedy’s tear-streaked face and blood-stained suit.”

American University fraternity house in Washington. I was an almost 18-year-old college freshman, and Dwight Eisenhower was the only president I had been aware of.”

Your memories of JFK BBC
“There was shock and disbelief in the United States and around the world. Some compare the impact of Kennedy’s assassination to that of the attacks on the US in September 2001. People alive then remember vividly the moment they heard he had been shot, just as people recall where they were when they first found out about the attacks on Washington and New York.”

‘Our president,’ by Colette Bancroft St. Petersburg Times
“On a bright, beautiful fall day, he landed at MacDill Air Force Base at midday. He lunched at its Officers Club, spoke at Al Lopez Field, the International Inn and Fort Homer Hesterly Armory, and rode in a motorcade through downtown Tampa. He returned to the base to fly on to Miami before dark.”

Coverage of assassination shaped TV’s Sept. 11 role, by Jim Cuprisen - Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel
“When Dan Rather first took the CBS anchor chair on the terrible morning of Sept. 11, 2001, after the second World Trade Center tower had been hit, he flashed back 38 years.”

Monday, November 17

Destiny takes a young president to Dallas, by Nellie Connally and Mickie Herskowitz - Albany Times-Union
“I left Austin for San Antonio at noon on Thursday, November 21. John was in Houston and would arrive shortly after me. It had been almost two years since I had seen the Kennedys, and although John and Jack had been in touch for various reasons, a lot had changed in the meantime. I was looking forward to renewing our friendship.”

The day JFK died, by R.D. Heldfelds - Akron Beacon Journal
“Census figures indicate that about half the current U.S. population wasn’t even born when John F. Kennedy was assassinated on Nov. 22, 1963.”

Sunday, November 16

Remembering Kennedy’s life, death, by Mark Dawidziak - Cleveland Plain-Dealer
“It was one of those moments that seemed painfully etched in every American’s consciousness. Yes, you knew where you were and what you were doing at the second you learned about Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963.”

JFK Had Style, Substance, by Les Payne - Newsday
“He was the first candidate I’d seen up close, John F. Kennedy. Wandering out of G. Fox Department store, I got washed up in the current of a political rally stirred by the Kennedy advance men. Just as suddenly, this black sedan dispensed a shock of brown hair who stood erect in blue serge and rasped almost poetically in what seemed like a mockery of a Boston accent.”

Saturday, November 15

Who Killed JFK? After 40 Years, Doubts Remain, by James Toedtman - New York Newsday
“The assassination of President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago jarred the country. A normally stoic Walter Cronkite paused to compose himself as he delivered the news. Men and women wept openly on the streets upon hearing. Then there was Jacqueline Kennedy’s tear-streaked face and blood-stained suit.”

40 years on, Arlen Specter and Cyril Wecht still don’t agree how JFK died, by Michael A. Fuoco - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
“Neither Wecht, then 32, nor Specter, then 33, could have known then they would soon become inextricably linked with that momentous event and the endless debate about what really happened during those ‘six seconds in Dallas’ on Nov. 22, 1963.”

History pays thoughtful tribute with `JFK,’ by Monica Collins - Boston Herald
“The Nov. 22, 1963, assassination of President John F. Kennedy was the first cataclysm carried live on TV. I vividly remember that on that bleak weekend 40 years ago,our family’s small black-and-white TV was always on. We clustered around to view what I comprehended to be the worst thing to happen so far in my young life.”

Friday, November 14

Nov. 22, 1963: Forty years later, TV’s fascination with JFK lives on, by Kay McFadden - Seattle Times
“Abraham Zapruder’s home-movie recording of Nov. 22, 1963, appears in dozens of specials centered on the anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s assassination. Such are the requirements of a famous life arrested by greater infamy.”

Networks seize JFK’s anniversary with zeal, by Melanie McFarland - Seattle Post-Intelligencer
“Those of us who weren’t even born on the day he died know the images well: a tiny John Jr. saluting his father’s casket, Walter Cronkite holding back tears while relaying the news of Kennedy’s death, suspect Lee Harvey Oswald being gunned down two days later by Jack Ruby in front of news cameras.”

Thursday, November 13

2 weeks of JFK specials mark 40th anniversary, by Don Kaplan - New York Post
“TV will commemorate the 40th anniversary of the murder of John F. Kennedy with more than 10 hours of special Kennedy-themed programming, starting tonight.”

Who killed JFK? by Stephen Battaglio - New York Daily News
“To mark the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, ABC, Court TV and Fox News Channel will air new investigations into whether Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone.”

UPI’s Pulitzer-winning coverage of JFK, by Tobin Beck - UPI
“Nov. 22 was a busy but routine Friday in the Dallas UPI bureau 40 years ago until a yell across the newsroom signaled one of history’s defining moments — the assassination of John F. Kennedy.”

Wednesday, November 12

What JFK conspiracy?: Dean College professor decries theory, by Emelie Rutherford - Milford Daily News
“Lee Harvey Oswald acted alone when he shot President John F. Kennedy 40 years ago on Nov. 22, 1963, and there was no conspiracy, Dean College Professor Harry L. Kreshpane has been telling local audiences for decades.”


Tuesday, November 11

Remembering John F. Kennedy, by Christopher Dreher - Publishers Weekly
“For decades, the Kennedys have been the most documented family in America, inspiring a spectrum of books, from histories to biographies to photo compilations, that play up the elements of mystery, scandal, romance and conspiracy that surround them. Leading up to the 40th anniversary of the assassination of John F. Kennedy on November 22, numerous network and cable TV specials and commemorative events are likely to spur interest in the tribute books arriving this fall. But despite lasting public fascination with the family, booksellers say that overall demand for Kennedy books is decreasing gradually.”

A nation’s loss, by Matt Towery - Town Hall
“This month marks the 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963. Surveys consistently show that event profoundly affected the outlook of an entire generation of Americans, much as 9/11 has the current one.”

The Kennedy Assassination – 40 Years Later Newswise
“40 years ago, on November 22nd, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while visiting Dallas, Texas. For those who lived through that event, it was a time of sadness and great fear of the unknown. 40 years later, the passage of time has allowed many to take a thorough look at the Kennedy presidency and its legacy.”

The Bear’s Lair: Was JFK a supply-sider? by Martin Hutchinson - UPI
“The 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination later this month is bringing the inevitable slew of retrospectives, either polishing the halo or belittling the achievements, according to taste. However, in the economic area, Kennedy’s greatest achievement was an anomalous one: he was the true father of the supply-side economic revolution.”

Monday, November 10

Framing John F. Kennedy in the History Books - Newswise
“Regardless of whether or not they were alive at the time of his presidency, most people ‘know’ or ‘remember’ John F. Kennedy through visual images, says Temple magazine professor Carolyn Kitch. ‘These iconic pictures appeared primarily in magazines during Kennedys time in office and his assassination, and, more importantly, have reappeared repeatedly in mass media over the past 40 years, especially when Jackie died in 1994 and when JFK Jr. died in 1999,’ notes Kitch, an expert in social memory and author of the journal article, ‘A Death in the American Family’”

Images of Kennedy years compared to classics, by Jane Stancill - News & Observer
“Wake Forest University art professor David Lubin has a new book that explores famous photographs and film images of President John F. Kennedy and his family. The book, “Shooting Kennedy: JFK and the Culture of Images,” was published this month by the University of California Press — just in time to mark the passage of 40 years since the assassination that shook the country. Lubin draws from Hollywood films, TV sitcoms, modern art, neoclassical painting and designer fashion in his book, which shows how the public came to romanticize the Kennedy family.”

 Friday, November 7

Court TV’s The JFK Assassination: Investigation Reopened, Examines Alleged Audio Evidence of Second Shooter Business Wire
“It was a crime that shocked the world – and sparked an investigation that is still going on today. Even after 40 years, the assassination of John F. Kennedy remains one of the 20th century’s most enduring and controversial mysteries. Was there a conspiracy? A cover-up? Was Lee Harvey Oswald the only gunman?”

Thursday, October 30

Andy Warhol Museum Commemorates 40th Anniversary of JFK Assassination with Exhibition ‘November 22, 1963: Image, Memory Myth’ Yahoo Finance
“To coincide with the 40th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, The Andy Warhol Museum presents ‘November 22, 1963: Image, Memory, Myth,’ a thought-provoking exhibition that presents the events of that defining moment in history from a number of perspectives, including the approach of Pittsburgh-native Andy Warhol.”

Tuesday, October 14

Dallas plans series of events to mark 40th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, by Mary McKee - Centre Daily
“As the nation prepares to mark the 40th anniversary of President Kennedy’s assassination, officials in Dallas began their observance on Tuesday by unveiling an exhibit about the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.”

 

 Updated 10/22/2013

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